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Full text of "Announcements for the year"

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON BULLETIN 



NEW SERIES 



AUGUST, 1913 



Vol. XI, No. 1 



Oregon High School 
Debating League 



ROBERT W. PRESCOTT 

Assistant Professor of Public Speaking 




Published monthly by the University of Oregon, and entered at the post-office in 
Eugene, Oregon, as second-class matter 



0: 

^4 OCT 1918 



OREGON 

HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING 

LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

for the year 

1913-14 



List of Officers, Contitution and By-Laws, 

Propositions for Debate, Bibliographies, 

Debate Libraries and Notes 



Prepared by 

ROBERT W. PRESCOTT 
Secretary of the League 
Assistant Professor of Public Speaking 
University of Oregon 



EUGENE. OREGON 

1913 




UNIVERSITY OF OREGON CUP 
Given by the Laurean and Eutaxian Literary Societies and Professor 
E. E. DeCou, organizer of the League, to stimulate debating among the high 
schools of the State. It is presented annually to the winning team and 
becomes the permanent property of the school winning it three times. 
Won by Albany, June 1. 1912. 
Won by North Bend, May 8, 1913. 
THE REGENTS CUP, in the permanent possession of Grants Pass. 
Won by Lebanon, May 29, 1908. 
Won by Grants Pass, June 4, 1909. 
Won by Pendleton, June 3, 1910. 
Won by Grants Pass, June 2, 1911. 



^J O 



■l\\ 




Lyle Chappell Norma Chase Ruby Watkins Georg-e Dewey 
NORTH BEND DEBATING TEAMS 

Winners of Coos Bay Championship; defeated Klamath Falls, Champions 
of Southern Oregon District, in Semi-finals; Norma Chase and Lyle 
Chappell, winners of State Chamionship from Springfield, at Villard 
Hall, University of Oregon, May 8, 1913. 



Oregon High School Debating League 



OFFICERS 

For the year 1913-1914 
R. W. Kirk, Superintendent of Schools, Corvallis, Oregon, President. 

Robt. W. Prescott, Assistant Professor of Public Speaking, University 
of Oregon, Secretary-^Treasurer, Eugene. 

Executive Committee 

P. L. Campbell, President University of Oregon, Eugene; 

J. A. Churchill, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Salem; 

R. W. Kirk, Superintendent of Schools, Corvallis; 

Cornelia Marvin, Secretary Oregon State Library, Salem; 

Robert W. Prescott, University of Oregon, Eugene. 

District Directors 

A. T. Park, Superintendent of Schools, Myrtle Point, Director Coos 
Bay District; 

A. C. Strange, Superintendent of Schools, Baker, Director Eastern Ore- 
gon District; 

A. F. Wilson, Principal of High School, McMinnville, Northern Willam- 
ette District; 

Geo. A. Briscoe, Superintendent of Schools, Ashland, Director South- 
ern Oregon District. 

Geo. W. Hug, Principal of High School, Eugene. 

J. G. Imel, Superintendent of Schools, Astoria, Director Lower Colum- 
bia River District; 

J. S. Landers, Superintendent of Schools, Pendleton, Director Umatilla 
District; 

G. W. Henderson, Superintendent of Schools, The Dalles, Director Up- 
per Columbia River District. 




Walter Bailey 



Frances Bartlett 



SPRINGFIELD DEBATING TEAM 

Winners of (Central Oregon District; won from St. Johns, Champion 
of Columbia River District, in semi-finals; defeated by North Bend for 
State Championship. 



Districts of State Debating League by Counties 

1913-1914 

Coos Bay District — Supt. A. T. Park, Myrtle Point, Director. Coos 
and Curry Counties. 

Eastern Oregon District — Supt. A. C. Strange, Baker, Director. Union, 
Wallowa, Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties. 

Lower Columbia District — Supt. J. G. Imel, Astoria, Director. Till- 
amook, Clatsop, Columbia and Multnomah Counties. 

Northern Willamette District — Principal A. F. Wilson, McMinnville, 
Director. Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, Polk and Marion 
Counties. 

Southern Oregon District — Supt. Geo. A. Briscoe, Ashland, Director. 
Josephine, Jackson, Klamath and Lake Counties. 

Southern Willamette District — Principal George Hug, Eugene, Director. 
Lincoln, Benton, Linn, Lane and Douglas Counties. 

Umatilla District — Supt. J. S. Landers, Pendleton, Director. Uma- 
tilla, Morrow, Gilliam and Wheeler Counties. 

Upper Columbia River District — Supt. G. W. Henderson, The Dalles, 
Director. Hood River, Wasco, Sherman and Crook Counties. 




E. Lawrena Rawson 
Basil Smith 



SS^^«&^ 



Edna M. Hollenbeck 
Johnstone Cheney 

ST. JOHNS DEBATING TEAM 

Winners of Columbia River District; defeated by Springfield in 
Semi-finals. 



Propositions for Debate 

1913-1914 

STATE QUESTION— For Inter- District and Final Contests 
Resolved, That the general welfare of the United States will be fos- 
tered by the Democratic Tariff Policy of the Sixty-third Congress. 

Coos Bay District 
Resolved, That the President of the United States should be limited 
to a single term of six years. 

Eastern Oregon District 
Resolved, That the Dillingham Immigration bill of the Sixty-third 
Congress should become law. 

Lower Columbia River District 
Resolved, That the United States should maintain a large navy. 

Northern Willamette District 

Resolved, That a Single House Legislature should be established in 
Oregon. 

Southern Oregon District ' 

Resolved, That the policy of the state of California, as embodied in the 
Alien Land Bill, should be adopted by Oregon. 

Southern Willamette District 
Resolved, That a graduated Income Tax is a desirable feature of a 
state system of taxation for Oregon. 

Umatilla District 
Resolved, That life imprisonment, with restricted power of pardon, 
is a desirable substitute for capital punishment in Oregon. 

Upper Columbia River District 

Resolved, That a majority of all the votes cast at the election should 

be required to pass an amendment to the State Constitution. 




4 





Edwin Cox 



Forrest Peil 




Annie Hales 

KLAMATH FALLS DEBATING TEAM 

Winners of Southern Oregon District; defeated by North Bend in 
Semi-finals. 



9 



Review of the Work of the League for 1913-14 

coos BAY DISTRICT 

In the contests of the State Debating League for the Coos Bay 
District, each school was represented by an affirmative and a negative 
team. The debates were all held on the evening of January 17, the 
negative teams remaining at home and the affirmative teams going to 
another town. By this arrangement, the Bandon affimative team went 
to Coquille, Coquille went to Marshfield, Miarshfield to Myrtle Point, 
Myrtle Point to North Bend, North Bend to Bandon. North Bend 
winning both her debates, was declared champion of Coos County. 

The debaters were as follows: 
North Bend- 
Affirmative: George Dewey and Lyle Chappell. 

Negative: Norma Chase and Dorothy Gibson. 
Marshfield — 

Affirmative: Leslie Isaacson and Chester Isaacson. 

Negative: Horace Rahskoph and Howard Schwartz. 
Bandon — 

Affirmative: Ernest Watkins and Pearl Crane. 

Negative: Kate Claburn and Jack Kronenberg. 
Myrtle Point — 

Affirmative: Roy Clark and Chester Adams. 

Negative: Dora Harrison and Cleo Dixon. 
Coquille — 

Affirmative: Fred Reynolsa and Beulah Price. 

Negative: Mae Lund and Janie Lowe. 

Sincerely yours, 

C. A. HOWARD. 

CENTRAL OREGON DISTRICT 

Springfield won the championship, working through the series as 
follows : 

Debate Held December 13, 1912. 

Corvallis vs. Junction City, affirmative teams visiting: 
Aff. Aff. 

Donald Dunkin Maurice Carroll Junction City won at home by 

Alva Starr W. C. Hoppas a 3 to vote and at Corvallis 

by 2 to 1. 
Neg. Neg. 

Roscoe Parcel Egner Heutze 

Forrest Lance Hobert McFadden 

Salem vs. Lebanon, affirmative team visiting: 
Aff. Aff. 

Joe Minton Hugh Kirkpatrick Lebanon won 3 to at home 

Angeline Carver Isabella Garland 2 to 1 at Salem. 

Neg. Neg. 

Harold Eakin Russell Hall 

Carl Beck Lurline Brown 

10 



Eugene Springfield Cottage Grove 

Aff. Aff. Aff. 

Ruth Westfall Frances Bartlett Albert Woodard 

Sophia Winthers Amy Carson Lucile Marson 

Neg. Neg. Neg. 

Margaret Pratt Ida Carson Fern Holcomb 

Martha Beer Herbert Hansen Ross Aubrey 

Eugene negative defeated by Springfield affimative at Eugene by 
a 2 to 1 vote. Cottage Grove negative defeated by Eugene affirmative 
at Cottage Grove by a 3 to voije. Springfield negative won over 
Cottage Grove affirmative at Springfield by 3 to vote. 
Djebate January 24, 1913 
Junction City defeated Lebanon at Lebanon, 3 to 0, negative teams 
visiting. Springfield defeated Lebanon at Springfield, 2 to 1. Spring- 
field defeated Junction City at Junction City, 3 to 0. In this debate, 
the Lebanon negative was composed of Russell Hall and Herbert Arm- 
strong. No other changes occurred in any of the teams. 

Trusting that this hasty report is sufficient to cover the ground, 
allowing only for the absence of names from Cottage Grove, I am, 

Very truly yours, 

C. C. Baker. 

SOUTHERN OREGON DISTRICT 

Klamath Falls and Ashland were the sole contestants for honors 
in this district. Klamath Falls, with Forrest Peil, Edwin Cox and 
Annie Hales, won from Ashland, with Jay Withrow, Leroy Ashcraft 
and Walter Carpenter. 

EASTERN OREGON DISTRICT 

Unrepresented for the year. 

COLUMBIA RIVER DISTRICT 

The Columbia River District of the State Debating League has 
had an unusually successful and profitable year's work. The following 
high schools participated in the debates: Astoria, Tillamook, Mc- 
Minnville, St. Helens St. Johns, Woodburn, Parkplace, Estacada, Ore- 
gon City, Forest Grove and The Dalles. The question debated was. 
Resolved, That the President of the United States should be nominated 
and elected by direct vote of the people. 

Following is a complete list of the students representing the vari- 
ous schools in these contests: 
Parkplace — 

Edith Little, Minnie Hemrich, Gwendolyn Jones, Ruth Hudson. 
Tillamook — 

Benley Stam, Vern Bain, Irwin Schnuelle. 
Forest Grove — 

Claud Hutchens, Ella Garrigus, Thomas Roe, Vinton Robinson, Glenn 

Morgan, Ruth Troutman. 
McMinnville— 

Irvine Armstrong, Martin Peterson, Sadie Bruce, Harry Stewart, 

Herbert Simonson, Harry White. 
St. Helens- 
Virgil Hattan, Cecil Ross, Mildred Allen, Margaret Burns. 
Woodburn — 

Arlie Walker, Alpha Gillette, Chester Vincent. 

11 



Astoria — 

Asta Carlson, Lloyd Hammarstrom, Lorens Loj?an, Jessie Garner. 

Estacada — 

Chester Warner, Malcolm Woodle, Harry Morgan. Harley Fellows. 

Oregon City — 

Elsie Tilford, Evangeline Dye, Joseph Hedges, Joseph Sheahan, 
Alice Downer, Edward Busch. 
St. Johns — 

Basil Smith, Lourena Rawson, Johnston Cheney Edna Hollenbeck. 
The Dalles- 
Howard MacDonald, Erma Bennett, Arthur Marsh, Irene Haskins, 

Diedrich Wolff, Donald Lewis. 

In the first series of debates, St. Johns, Parkplace, Oregon City 
Woodburn and The Dalles were successful. The second series eliminated 
Parkplace and Oregon City. The Dalles then met Woodburn in single 
debate and was defeated and two weeks later the final debate for the 
District championship between St. Johns and Woodburn resulted in a 
victory for the former school. Of the St. Johns debaters, Basil Smith, 
Lourena Rawson and Edna Hollenbeck are entitled to the honor of 
winning for their high school the District championship. 

Only one serious difficulty in the management of district affairs has 
arisen this year. This was the difficulty of pairing schools, owing to 
the fact that no fixed system in the matter of number of debaters and 
number of teams was followed. Some of the schools had two teams 
of two debaters each, some one of three, and some two of three each. 
The Director is to blame for this condition. In order to induce as many 
of the small high schools to enter the League as possible, he agreed to 
allow them to come in following any one of the above mentioned sys- 
tems. This should not be permitted again. In fact, I would recom- 
mend that an amendment be added to our Constitution fixing abso- 
lutely the system to be followed. To give the smaller high schools as 
good chances of success as possible, I would suggest that every school 
be required to prepare for the ealie.* intra-district debates two teams 
of two debaters each, rather than two of three each, and that all 
these debates be either dual or triangular. Such a system required by 
the constitution would do away with any further difficulty of this kind. 

On the whole the season has been a profitable one. Some of the 
high schools were eliminated from the contest early but I am confident 
that their students, as well as the students of these high schools re- 
maining in longer, gained in valuable knowledge of one of our great 
political problems, gained in knowledge of the art of argumentation, 
gained a friendlier attitude towards and greater respect for the stu- 
dents of other high schools, and gained in wholesome confidence in 
their own institution. I sincerely trust that the school year 1913-14 
will bring about broader and better debate work in the Columbia 
River District. 

For one regrettable condition which too often grows out of these 
inter-school contests, i. e., mutual distrust among the students and 
teachers of the institutions, I believe teachers are much to blame. No 
person who would conduct one of these contests in dishonorable fashion 
who would endeavor to win by using incompetent or prejudiced judges, 
or by permitting other students of his school to strive to prevent by 
disorderly conduct the representatives of the rival school from doing 
their best work, is fit to be a teacher. In fact, not only should such 
conditions not prevail, and I am glad to say they very seldom do, but 

12 



I believe that the teachers of the rival schools should do all in their 
power to teach their students confidence in and respect for the stu- 
dents and teachers of the other schools. When defeated, even if they 
feel that the judges may not have given their debaters entire justice, 
they should conceal that feeling, should express nothing but satisfac- 
tion, and should do all in their power by example and precept to pro- 
duce friendliness among the rival debaters. If every high school teach- 
er having to do with the debate work would do these things, one of 
the chief objections to inter-high school debating would be removed. 

Respectfully, 

A. C. STRANGE, 
Director of Columbia River District. 

A Message from the President 

The founders and organizers of the Oregon High School Debating 
League should be considered public benefactors. More benefit of a 
potential and permanent character has been accomplished and is yet 
to be accomplished by the League for the young people of Oregon 
than any of us have appreciated. A glance at the debate subjects used 
in the last few years will convince anyone that theoretical and im- 
practical, though debatable questions, have not been used, but that all 
have been questions of vast importance to our communities and our gov- 
ernment. Many of the subjects discussed three or four years ago, 
new and debatable then, have since been enacted into laws. Some are 
now a part of our widely celebrated Oregon System. These reforms, 
although wise and beneficial, could not be, and should not be, adopted 
until they Vv^ere thoroughly understood. It is not preposterous to as- 
sume that a study and discussion of a subject by hundreds of high school 
students, teachers, parents, and friends, as well as the interest aroused 
in those who have listened to the debates all over the state, has had 
much to do with our advance position. 

In addition to this benefit occurring to the citizenship and to the 
state, is the individual ability, so much desired by all people after they 
leave school and so little sought after while in school, the ability to 
speak in public. How frequently we hear men and women say they 
wish they had been compelled in earlier years to take public speaking 
as a part of their course. While we would not compel, we would en- 
courage such efforts. This the Debating League does, and no other 
agency has been devised that does it so successfully. 

While the League has been a conspicuous success and has been in- 
valuable to the state, there are still obstacles to be overcome and de- 
fects to be remedied. Last winter at the annual meeting of the League 
the Executive committee was instructed to amend the constitution so as 
to remove one objectionable feature which has appeared in a few 
cases, the tendency of over-zealous friends of the debaters to render 
too expensive assistance in preparing speeches. The executive com- 
mittee seemed unable to secure a satisfactory wording for such an 
amendment, as it is not a matter which has definite limits. High 
school students should be wisely directed, and much assistance must be 
given them in finding the kernel of a subject or mapping out a line 
of argument, but we can not condemn in too strong terms the actions 
of those, whether instructors or supposed friends, who use high school 
students as mere talking machines to utter forceful logic and rhetor- 
ical phrases not their own. 

13 



There are those who contend that a hig:h school student should write 
out his argument to clarify the material in his own mind, and further 
to be sure that his meag^re vocabulary has not led him into ambig^uous 
or misleading: expressions of his ideas. But whatever their views on 
this question, all should consider it dishonorable to allow any student's 
work to be so recast by another person as to be no longer his own pro- 
duction. In this case as in all others, there are two extremes, either 
of which is undesirable. Students may have too much help or too 
little. The honest instructor and the honest team will find the happy 
medium — the honorable way. 

The state has this year been divided into eight districts by the 
executive committee, hoping that we may thus enlist a greater number 
of schools, large and small, in the League. We wish to urge district 
directors and others to aid in furthering the interests of a worthy in- 
stitution. Much benefit comes to any student body from friendly com- 
petition with other schools. 

As a conclusion allow me to refer all who may read this article to 
the helpful and illuminating suggestions made in the Bulletin last year 
by Supt. W. R. Rutherford, at that time president of the League. 

R. W. KIRK, 

President Debating League. 



Debate Libraries of the Oregon State Library 

These collections of material upon public questions are loaned with- 
out charge to Oregon schools upon proper application. This means that 
the application must be made: by the principal, or by the teacher who is 
in charge of the debate work. Loans are made through public libraries 
when possible, as it is generally considered better to supplement public 
library collections so that schools shall not pay cost of transportation 
upon material which is to be had locally, and shall not deprive other 
schools of this. The period of the loan is three weeks with possible re- 
newal for two weeks if the material is not desired elsewhere. It is bet- 
ter for schools to apply for small libraries to be kept a short time, rather 
than to ask for complete libraries which cannot profitably be used in 
so short a time. No loans are made to schools which mark the books 
and pamphlets and return them in bad condition. The fine for keeping 
libraries beyond time is 25c a day. Privileges of the library are with- 
drawn in case of loss of pieces. 

The library makes every effort to meet the needs of the schools, 
but it has many borrowers among schools and debating societies and 
can do justice to all of them only by enforcing the rules strictly. A 
new list of questions for debate will soon be issued. 



AIDS FOR DEBATERS. 



A list of books recommended by the State Library for high school libraries. 
The prices in parentheses are the "school prices" from the State School Li- 
brary List. 

Parliamentary Practice: 

Robert. Rules of order. Scott. 75c (49c). 

14 



Robert. Primer of parliamentary law. Doubleday. 75c (48c). 
Public Speaking: 

Clark & Blanchard. Piactical public speaking. Scribner. $1.00 (85c). 

Everts. The speaking voice; principles of training simplified and 
condensed. Harper. $1.00 (85c). 

Shurter. Extempore speaking for school and college. Ginn. 90c (77c). 
Debating : 

Alden. Art of debate. Holt. $1.12 ($1.00). 

Carnegie library, Pittsburg. Debate index. 2d ed. Pittsburg, 
Carnegie library. 20c. 

An index to the debaters' manuals in the Carnegie library, Pitts- 
burg. 

Foster. Argumentation and debating. Houghton. $1.25 ($1.07). 
Contains specimen briefs and debates and a list of propositions 
for debate for advanced students. 

Foster. Essentials of exposition and argument. Houghton. 1911. 
90c. The best book upon the subject. Based upon his argumen- 
tation and debating. 
Laycock & Scales. Argumentation and debate. Macmillan. $1.10 
(95c). A good exposition of the principles of debating. More 
advanced than the book below. 

Laycock & Spofford. Manual of argumentation for high schools 
and academies. Macmillan. 50c (42c). Excellent book for 
beginners. 

Thomas. Manual of debate. American Book Co. 80c. Intended 
as a drill book for beginners. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension division. How to judge a debate. 
Univ. of Wisconsin. 10c. 

Wisconsin. University. Extension division. Principles of effect- 
ive debating. 3d ed. Wilson. 15c. 
Questions with briefs: 

Brookings & Ringwalt. Briefs for debate on current political, econ- 
omic and social topics. 1895. Longmans. $1.25 (90c). 
Note preface on ''The art of debate." 

Carpenter. Debate outlines on public questions. New ed. Broad- 
way Pub. Co. $1.00. 

Ringwalt. Briefs on public questions. Longmans. $1.20 (95c). 

Robbins. High school debate book. McClurg. $1.00 (90c). Ex- 
cellent for beginners. 
Periodical articles: 

Readers' guide to periodical literature. 1900-1904. Wilson. $16. 
($8). 

1905-1909. Wilson. $24 ($12). 

Annual volumes 1910-date. Wilson. $7 ($3.50). 

A file of some of the best periodicals is desirable, and a team which 
Is constantly debating public questions must have access to the current 
numbers of the Outlook and Nation. Indexes to current magazines and 
newspapers are essential. All available indexes are owned by the Com- 
mission, and will be consulted for any subject, upon request. It is possible 
that many of the magazine references may be borrowed from the people 
of the different towns. Articles indexed in the publications noted above may 
be rented from the H. W. 'Wilson Co., of Minneapolis. Cost of first article 
in each order is 10c, and for each additional article ordered at same time, 5c. 

Government Documents: — (Apply to Department or Congressman.) 

The library should have a hie of the reports and bulletins of the 
Labor Bureau; sets of reports of the Department of Commerce 
and labor; a set of publications of last census; the Statistical 
abstract; the last Official directory; Consular reports (with in- 

15 



dexes); recent volumes of Congressional Record; Presidents' 
messages; Industrial Commission Report (difficult to secure); 
other sets should be secured for special needs — Reports of Com- 
missioner of Immigration for debate on that subject, etc. 
Indexes to Government Document: 

Write to Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C, for the 
following: 

Catalog of Public Documents of the 53d-60th Congress and all De- 
partments of the Government, Mar. 4, 1893-June 30, 1901, Vols- 
1-9. 

Tables of annotated indexes to the Congressional Series of United 
States public documents. 1902. 
Index to the subjects of the documents and reports and to thee om- 
mittees, senators and representatives presenting them, with ta- 
bles of the same in numerical order, being the "Consolidated 
Index" provided for by the Act of Jan, 12, 1895. 54th Cong. 1st 
sess. Dec. 1895-date. 

Check list of United States public documents, 1789-1909. 3d Ed. 
Vol. 2, not yet published, will be an index to Vol. 1. 

Monthly catalog-. United States public documents. $1.10 a year. 
State Documents: 

Every high school should have recent Oregon state documents, and 
particularly the Oregon Blue Book, and the annual report of the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics. For lists of recent publications of 
the various' states the Mont<hly Itist of publicatioi^s, which 
may be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Wash- 
ington, D. C, for 50c a year, is most useful. 
Almanacs and Yearbooks: (The last annual issue for each is given) 

American year book, 1912, Appleton. $3.50 ($3.30 incl. postag-e). 
Especially useful in the fields of economics, political sceince, 
public works, legislation, commerce, politics and government. 

Brittanica Year Book, 1913. Encyclopedia Brittanica Co. $1.75. 
The first volume issued. Historical and statistical, covering the 
years 1910-12. 

Chicago Daily News Almanac and Year Book, 1913. Chicago Daily 
News. 45c. 

New International Year Book, 1913. Dodd. $5. Contains very 
full articles on all events of importance during the year and on 
all subjects that have been marked by change or progress. 

Tribune Almanac, 1913. New York Tribune. 25c. 

World Almanac and Encyclopedia, 1913. New York Press Pub. Co. 
35c. 
General : 

Bliss. Encyclopedia of Social Reform. Funk. $7.50 ($5.65). 
Encyclopedias: 

References are not given to these, but it is assumed that debaters 
will look up all questions in the New International and Brittan- 
ica cyclopedias. 



16 



B'bliographies on the State and District 

Questions Prepared by the Oregon 

State Library 

These bibliographies are not complete but contain only those books, 
pamphlets and articles which are to be had from the dealers or libraries. 
The debate libraries contain many other things as well as these listed. 
Every high school should have certain United States documents in its 
reference library including afile of the Congressional records for the 
past few years, the Census Reports and Bulletins, the Labor Bureau 
Reports and Bulletins, and the Statistical abstract. The high school 
library should also have the best almanacs, preferably the World alman- 
ac and the Chicago Daily News, in the latest editions, and Bliss' En- 
cyclopedia of social reform. The library does not loan these books which 
any school may own with very little exp^enditure of money. It is usually 
not possible for high schools to get replies if letters are addressed to 
governors and secretaries of state, nor to receive state publications 
which are mentioned in these lists. It will probably be necessary to 
borrow these from the Library. The newspaper articles are not in- 
cluded, though they often give the most important discussions of some 
of the subjects. The Library no longer loans these newspaper clippings 
to debating: societies without special guarantee, as these have been care- 
lessly handled and cannot be replaced. Few periodical articles are includ- 
ed because every high school should have the index to current periodicals, 
the Readers' guide, published by the H. W. Wilson Co.. Minneapolis, 
Minn. High schools are not equipped to undertake debate work unless 
this reference material is at hand, and libraries are intended to supple- 
ment the high school reference library. The recent Oregon documents 
are generally available in schools. The "Voters' pamphlet" and collec- 
tion of Oregon laws are not included in the bibiographies, nor in the 
State libraries, because it is to be expected that they may be found in 
every town, and sets are always available in county seats and places 
where there are public libraries. 



TARIFF 

Only a few of the books and pamphlets on this subject have been 
noted. The reference books mentioned in the preneral list should be 
consulted, and special attention should be given to the message of 
President Wilson at the opening of Congress, and to the numbers of 
the Cong-ressional record giving- the debates on the bill now being con- 
sidered. No definite statement of the question having been given, mag- 
azine articles are not listed, but these may be secured by reference to 
the indexes. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

Brookings, W. D. & Ring-wait, R. C. Briefs for debate. 1895. 
Longmans, p. 96-101. 

Pearson, P. M. Intercollegiate debates. 1901. Hinds, p. 111-25. 

Ringwalt, R. C. Briefs on public questions. 1905. Long-mans, 
p. 95-104. 

Speaker 4; 365-71. 

17 



Books and Pamphlets: 

Barker, J. E. 101 points ag^ainst free trade. 1909. Wash., Govt. 

Fisk, G. M. International commercial policies with special refer- 
ence to the United States. 1907. Macmillan. 

George, Henry. Protection or free trade? 1886. Doubleday. 

Low, A. M. Protection in the United States; a study of the origin 
and growth of the American tariff system. 1904. King. 

Morgan, J. E., comp. Selected articles on free trade and protection. 
1912. Wilson. 

Pierce, Franklin. Tariff and the trusts. 1907. Macmillan. 

Smart, William. Return to protection. 1904. Macmillan. 

Tarbell, I. M. The tariff in our times. 1906-11. Macmillan. 

Taussig, F. W. Tariff history of the United States. 5th ed. 1910. 
Putnam. 

U. S. Congress. House. An act to reduce tariff duties and to 
provide revenue for the government, and for other purposes. (63d 
Cong., 1st sess. H. R. 3321). 

U. S. Congress. House. Report (to accompany H. R. 3321), (63d 
Cong., 1st sess. House. Report No. 5). 



ALIEN LAND BILL. 
High School Reference Books: 

See list of general reference books, particularly the Almanacs 
and Year Books. Also consult files of the Oregonian. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

There are no available briefs or biblio'graphies. 
Books and Pamphlets: 

Asiatic exclusion league, San Francisco. Proceedings. 

California. Bureau of labor statistics. Biennial reports. 

California. Legislature, 1913. An act relating to the rights, pow- 
ers and disabilities of aliens, and of certain companies, associa- 
tions and corporations with respect to property in this state. 
(Alien land bill). 

Ichihashi, Yamato. Japanese immigration; its status in California. 
1913. San Francisco, Japanese association of America. 

Japanese and Korean exclusion league, San Francisco. Publica- 
tions. 

Kawakami, K. K. American-Japanese relations. 1912. Revell. 

Oregon. Bureau of labor statistics. Annual reports. 

Oregon. Legislature, 1913. House joint proposal endorsing the pro- 
visions of the Asiatic exclusion act. H, J. M. No. 10, 

U. S. Bureau of immigration and naturalization. Reports. Wash., 
Govt. 
Periodical Articles: 

California Outlook, 14:5-6. April 26, 1913. Alien land laws and the 
Japanese situation. C. H, Rowell. 

Forum, 50:66-76, July 1913. Japanese- American relations. Edwin 
Maxey. 

Forum, 50:82-93. The Japanese on our farms. K, K. Kawakami. 

Independent, 62:26-33, Jan. 8, 1907. Japanese question from a 
Californian's standpoint. J. Kahn, 

Independent, 62:429-34, Feb. 21, 1907. Pacific coast and the orient. 
G. C. Perkins. 

Nation, 96-458, May 8, 1913. The nation and California (editorial). 

Outlook, 103:875-6, April 26, 1913. Aliens bill in California, 
itorial). 

18 



Outlook, 103:875-6, April 26, 1914. Aliens land bill in California. 

Is there need for restriction? (editorial) 
Outlook, 104:6-8, May 3, 1913. The California land law ag:itation. 

Is there a Japanese peril? (Editorial). 
Outlook, 104:14-16, May 3, 1913. Japan, California and the United 

States, (editorial) 
Outlook, 104:22-4, May 3, 1913. Japanese in California; a poll of 

the press. 
Outlook, 104:41-3, May 10, 1913. Alien land situation in California. 

(editorial) 
Outlook, 104:61-5 May 10, 1913. White and yellow in California. 

W. V. Wochlke. 
Outlook, 104:129-30, May 24, 1913. Governor Johnson on the Alien 

land law. The Webb bill and treaty rights, (editorial) 
Outlook, 104:139-40, May 24, 1913. Japan and the United States. 

(Editorial). 
Outlook, 104:223-4, May 31, 1913. Japan and America. (Editorial). 
Sunset, 31:122-7, July, 1913. Keeping: the Coast clear; the Japani- 

zation of Hawaiia; a warning: to the West. Arthur Dunn. 
World's work, 25:195-201, July, 1913. The Japanese in California. 

C. H. Rowell. 



SIX-YEAR PRESIDENTIAL TERM. 
High School Reference Books: 

See list of general reference books. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

There are no available briefs or bibliographies. 
Books and Pamphlets: 

Ames, H. V. Proposed amendments to the constitution of the 
United States during the first century of its history. Am. Hist. 
Assn. Report 1896. 1897. Wash. Govt., v. 2, p. 123-8. 

Bryce, James. American commonwealth. New ed. 1911. v. 1, 
p. 45-6. 

The Federalist. The Federalist, a commentary on the Constitution 
of the United States, ed. by Henry C. Lodge. 1902. Putnam. 
The H. W. Wilson Co., of Minneapolis, publishes a pamphlet of 
select articles on this subject. Price, 25c. 

Hart, A. B. Actual government. New ed. 1906. p. 265-6. 

Karson, J. A. Evolution of the constitution of the United States. 
1904. Houghton, p. 96-105. 

Leacock, S. B. Elements of political science. 1906. Houghton, 
p. 189-91. 

McKee, T. H. National conventions and platforms, 1789-1905. 1901. 
Friedenwald. 

Richardson, J. D., comn. Messages and papers of the Presidents. 
1893-95. Wash. Govt. v. 2, p. 448; v. 3, p. 117; v. 6, p. 691: 
V. 7, p. 445. 

Stanwood, Edward. History of the presidency. 1898. Houghton. 

U. S. Congress. House. Six year presidential term; report of the 
committee on the .iudiciary. (62d Cong. 2d sess., H, rept. 885). 

U. S. 62d Cong., 2d sess. Senate. Senate .joint resolution propos- 
ing an amendment to the Constitution providing for a six-year 
presidential term. S. J. R. 78. (For discussion see Congress- 
ional index for that session and the following one.) 

Works, J. D. The presidential term: speech in the senate of the 
United States, Dec. 9-10, 1912. Wash., Govt. 

19 



Periodical Articles: 

Chautauquan, 67:103-5, July, 1912. The singfle six-year term. 

Independent, 74:335-6, Feb. 13, 1913. The presidential term. 

Literary Digest, 44:1086-7, May 25, 1912. The one-term movement. 

Literary Biggest, 45:327-9, Feb. 15. 1913. Six-year presidents. 

World's Work, 25:499-500, March, 1913. A six-year term for pres- 
idents, (editorial) 

Nation, 94:484, May 16, 1912. The presidential term. 

Nation, 94:636-7. June 27. 1912. The presidential term. 

Nation, 96:120, Feb. 6, 1913. The presidential term. 

Outlook, 101:52-3, May 25, 1912. Another effort to hamper the 
people. 

Outlook. 102:879-81, Dec. 28, 1912. Presidential term; a poll of the 
press. 

Outlook, 103:331, Feb. 15, 1913. The six-year term. 



STATE INCOME TAX. 

NOTE: — Most of the material listed applies to the Federal income tax, 
but the same arguments apply to State income tax. All the obtainable 
literature upon State income tax has been included. 

High School Reference Books: 

See list of general reference books, and files of Oregonians. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

Brookings, W. D. & Ringwalt, R. C. Briefs for debate. 1895. Long- 
mans, p. 117-20. 

Robins, E. C. High school debate book. 1911. McClurg, p. 109-17. 

Speaker. Income tax; Franklin & Marshall-Swarthmore. 3:296-301. 

Wisconsin. University. Extension division. Income tax. (Bul- 
letin series No. 329. General series No. 194.) 
Books and Pamphlets: 

Adams, H. C. Science of finance. 1898. Holt. 

Bastable, C. F. Public finance. 1903. Macmillan, p. 469-494. 

British Columbia. Legislative assembly. Synopsis of report and 
full report of Royal commission on taxation, 1911. Victoria, 
Legislative assembly. 

Bullock, C. J. comp. Selected readings in public finance. 1906. 
Ginn, p. 254-306. 

Daniels, W. M. Elements of public finance. 1899. Holt, p. 181- 
206. 

Ely, R. T. Taxation in American states and cities. 1888. Crowell, 
p. 287-311. 

Kennan, K. K. Income taxation, methods and results in various 

countries. 1910. Burdick & Alien 
This book contains a summary of the arg"uments ag'ainst the income tax. 

Kinsman, D. O. The income tax in the commonwealth of the United 
States. 1903. Macmillan. 

McGovern, F. E. A state income tax, Madison, The State, 1913. 

Means. D. M. Methods of taxation. 1909. Dodd, p. 138-71. 
National Tax Association. Prcceedings: 

These proceedings contain many speeches upon all phases of the 
subject of taxation and special attention is called to the follow- 
ing articles: 

Adams, T. S. Income tax in the state of Wisconsin. 1910. 

Bullock, C. J. Taxation of intangible property. 1908. 

Easterday, J. H. Taxation of money and credits. 1908. 

Haugen, N. P. The Wisconsin income tax. 1912. 

Kennan, K. K. Wisconsin income tax law. 1911. 

20 



Pierce, F. G. Taxation of money and credits. 1907. 

Pleydell, A. C. Shifting- the tax. 1907. 

Phelps, E. M. comp. Selected articles on the income tax; with 
special reference to g^raduation and exemption. 1909. Wilson. 
(Debaters' handbook.) 

Plehn, C. C. Introduction to public finance. 1909. Macmillan, p. 
313-35. 

Seligrman, E. R. A. Income tax, a study of the history, thoery and 
practice of income taxation at home and abroad. 1911. Mac- 
millan. 

Seligman, E. R. A. Progressive taxation in theory and practice. 
2d ed. 1909. (American economic Asn. quarterly. 3d series, 
V. 9, No. 4. Dec, 1908.) 

Selig-man, E. R. A. Shifting and incidents of taxation. 1899. Mac- 
millan, p. 307-9. 

Wells, D. A. Theory and practice of taxation. 1900. Appleton. 

State Laws and Documents — Articles Relating to Various States: 

The Oregon Library Commission can supply tlie latest tax laws and tax 
reports for most of the States. 

California. Commission on revenue and taxation. Preliminary re- 
port, Aug., 1906, p. 15-16. 
California. Legislature. Act to provide for the assessment, levy 

and collection of an income tax. (Senate bill No. 46, Jan. 14. 

1907.) 
Massachusetts, Governor. Message on taxation of incomes. May 

17, 1911. (Extract from Mass. House Journal.) 
Minnesota. Legislature. 1907. Bill for an act providing for an 

income tax. 
New York. A state income tax for New York (Collier's, Jan. 

26, 1907.) 
Oklahoma. Campbell, R. A. Income tax, Oklahoma. (American 

Political Science Review. Notes on current legislation, 3:78-9. 

Feb. 1909.) 



STATE INCOME TAX. 



Oregon. Initiative petition. Measures relating to taxation to be 
submitted at the regular general election Nov. 5, 1912. Pub- 
lished by Board of Tax Commissioners 

This pamphlet contains all of the tax measures inclu:leci in the 1912 
'Voters' pamphlet." 

Oregon. Governor (Chamberlain). Income tax. (From his mes 

sage, 1907.) 
Oregon. Legislature, 1913. House joint resolution providing for 

amendment to constitution relating to uniform rules of assess- 
ment and taxation. H. J. R. No. 9. 1913. 
Wisconsin. Legislature. Joint resolution, 1909 for tax amendment. 

(Jt. res. No. 19, S.) 
Wisconsin. Tax Commission. The Wisconsin income tax law of 

1911, with explanatory notes, governor's special message, etc. 

Madison, The State, 1911. 
Wisconsin. Reed, R. E. The income tax in Wisconsin; its history, 

what it is intended to remedy and its essential features. (La 

Follett's, 4: p. 7-8, 22-3. Oct. 5, 1912.) 

21 



SINGLE HOUSE LEGISLATURES. 
High School Reference Books: 

See list of g:eneral reference books. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

There are no available briefs or bibliographies. 
Books and Pamphlets: 

Ashley, R. L. The American federal state. 1911. Macmillan, p. 
225-26. 

Bagehot, Walter. The English constitution, and other political 
essays. ' Appleton. 1903. (See chapter on House of Lords.) 

Beard, C. A. & Schultz, B. E. Documents ,on the state-wide in- 
itiative, referendum and recall. 1912. Macmillan, p. 10. 

Equity Series, 15:155-61. July, 1913. The problem of state gov- 
ernment. 

The Federalist. TheFederalist, a commentary on the Constitution 
of the United States, ed. by Henry C. Lodge. 1902. Putnam, 
(See index under Senate.) 

Garner, J. W. Introduction to political science. 1910. Amer. Bk. 
Co., p. 427-40. 

Gitteau, W. B. Government and policies in the United States. 1911. 
Houghton, p, 95. 248. 

Kansas. Governor (Hodges). 1913. Message relative to a single 
chamber legislature. March 10, 1913. 

Leacock, Stephen. Elements of political science. 1906. Hough- 
ton, p. 159-62. 

Moran, T, F. Rise and development of the bicameral system iv 
America. 1895. Johns Hopkins Press. 

Moses, Bernard. Government of the United States. 1911, Apple 
ton, p. 58-60. 

Munro, W. B. Government of American cities. 1912. Macmillan, 
p. 6-7, 10. 

Oberholtzen, E. P. Referendum in America. 1911. Scribner, p. 69- 
72. 

Sidgwick, Henry. Elements of politics. 2d ed. 1897. Macmil- 
lan, p. 465-80. 

Temperly, H. W. V. Senate and upper chambers, their use and 
function in the modern state. 1910. Chapman, 

Wilson, Woodrov^. Congressional government. Houghton. 1885. 
(See index.) 

Wilson, Woodrow. The state. 1898. Heath, p. 487-88. 
Periodical Articles: 

Contemporary review, 97:545-54., May 10. One chamber or two? 
H. Spender. 

Nineteenth century and after, 62:689-98, Nov. 1907. The second 
chamber. Andrew Carnegie. 

Nineteenth century and after, 68:31-42. July, 1910. Political sov- 
ereignty and a reformed chamber. G. C. Clark. 



AMENDMENT OF STATE CONSTITUTIONS. 

High School Reference Books: 

See list of general reference books. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

There are no available briefs or bibliographies. 
Books and Pamphlets: 

Beard, C. A. & Schultz. B. E. Documents on the state-wide initia- 
tive referendum and recall. 1912. Macmillan. 

22 



Bryce, James. American commonwealth. New ed. 1910. Mac- 
millan, v. 1, p. 464-80. 

Dodd, W. F. Revision and amendment of state constitutions. 1910. 
Johns Hopkins Press. 

Eaton, A. H. The Oregon system, 1912. McClurg. 

Gitteau, W. B. Government and politics in the United States. 1911. 
Houghton, p. 91-93. 

Hart, A. B. Actual government. 2d ed. 1904. Longmans, p. 59-63. 

Oberholtzer, E. P. Referendum in America. New ed. 1911. Scrib- 
ner. 

Oregon. Secretary of state. Abstract of votes cast in the sev- 
eral counties in the state of Oregon at the general election, 
November, A. D. 1912. Comp. by B. W. Olcott. 

Phelps, E. M., comp. Selected articles on the initiative and refer- 
endum. 2d ed. 1911. Wilson. (Debaters' hand book series.) 

Smith, J. A. Spirit of American government. 1907. Macmillan, 
p. 235-38. 

Stoddart, J. F. Against the referendum. 1910. Hodder. 

Wilcox, D. F. Government by all the people. 1912. Macmillan. 

Wilson, Woodrow. The state. Rev. ed. 1898. Heath, p. 476-78. 
Periodical Articles: 

Atlantic, 97:792-96, June, 1906. Constitution amending and the in- 
itiative. F. Foxcroft. 

Twentieth century magazine, 3:132-34, Nov. 1910. Practical con- 
servation of popular sovereignty. Jonathan Bourne. 

Yale review, 17:85-92, May, 1908. What proportion of voters neg- 
lect to go to the polls? H. S. Lyon. 



NAVY. 
High School Reference Books: 

See list of general reference books. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

Brookings, W. D. & Ringwalt, R. C. Briefs for debate. 1895. Long- 
mans, p. 78-80. 
Indiana. State Library. Bulletin 5:3. 

Minnesota High School Debating League. Sixth annual report. 
Montana High School Debating League. Bulletin of the University 

of Montana, October, 1908. 
Pearson, P. M., comp. Intercollegiate debates. 1909. Hinds, p. 293- 

302. 
Wisconsin University. Extension division. Debating and public 

discussion. 1910. (Bulletin ser. no. 386, Gen. ser. no. 233.) 
Books and Pamphlets: 

American Assn. for International Conciliation, 501 W. 116th St., 

N. Y. Publications. 
American Peace Society, 31 Beason St., Boston, Mass. Publications. 
American Political Science Assn. Proceedings, 1910. p. 199-201. 
American Society for Judicial Settlement of International Disputes, 

Baltimore, Md. Publications. 
Angell, Norman. The great illusion; a study of the relation of 

military power in nations to their economic and social advantage. 

1911. Putnam. 
Butler, N. M. The international mind. 1912. Scribner. 
Carnegie, Andrew. Armaments and their results. 1909. Peace 

Society. 
Chittenden, H. M. A present duty and a future hope. 1911. Mc- 

Clurg. 

23 



Chittenden, H. M. War or peace. 1911. McClurg. 

D'Estournelles de Constant, Paul Henri Benjamin, baron de. Report 
on the limitation of armaments. 1906. Lond. Peace Society. 

Dole, F. C. Spirit of democracy. 1906. Crowell, p. 233-247. 

Fanning, C. E. comp. Selected articles on the enlargement of the 
navy. 1906, Wilson. 

International School of Peace, 29A Beacon St., Boston, Mass. Pub- 
lications. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration. (Sec. H. C. 
Phillips, Lake Mohonk, N. Y.) Publications. 

Lynch, Frederick. Peace problem, the task of the twentieth cen- 
tury. 1911. Revell. 

McCabe, Joseph & Darien, Georges. Can we disarm? 1899. Stone. 

Mahan, A. T. Some neglected aspects of war; together with The 
power that makes for peace by H. S. Pritchett and The Capture 
of private property at sea by J. S. Corbett. 1907. Little. 

Mead, L. A. Patriotism and the new internationalism. 1906. Ginn. 

Mead, L. A. Swords and ploughshares. 1912. Putnam. 

Navy League of the United States, Washington. Publications. 

Novicow, Jaques. War and its alleged benefits; tr. by Thomas Selt- 
zer. 1911. Holt. 

Perris, G. H. A short history of war and peace. 1911. Holt. 

Roosevelt, Theodore. Administration. Civil service. 1897. Put- 
nam, p. 140-75. 

Sadler, W. F. Protest against increase of army and navy and plea 
for peace; address Memorial day. Camp Hill 1908. Comman 
Printing Co., Carlisle, Pa. 

World Peace Foundation, 29A Beacon St., Boston, Mass. Publica- 
tions. 
United States Documents: 

U. S. 61st Cong., 2d sess. House of Representatives. Committee 
on naval affairs. Report No. 807. 

U. S. 61st Cong., 2d sess. House of Representatives. Speech on 
the Naval appropriation bill, April 8, 1910. 

U." S. Navy Department. Annual reports. 

U. S. Navy Year books, 

U. S. Office of Naval Intelligence. Information concerning some 
of the principal navies of the world; a series of tables compiled 
to answer popular inquiry. 

U. S. Presidents. Messages. 

U. S. War Department. Annual reports. 
Periodical Articles: 

Collier's, June 15, 1907. Farce at The Hague. F. Palmer. 

Collier's, March 2. 1907. The navy still grows. 

Cosmopolitan, 44:584-93, May, 1908. If war should come. 1. The 
question of preparedness. R. P. Hobson. 

Cosmopolitan. 45:37-47, June, 1908. If war should come. 2. The 
conflict. R. P. Hobson. 

North Amer. Rev., 191:636-41, May, 1910. Military preparedness. 
W. H. Carter. 

North Amer. Rev., 188:564-76, Oct., 1908. The fleet. S. B. Luce. 

North Amer. Rev., 188:795-6, Nov., 1908. World politics. 

Outlook, 88:896-98, April 25, 1908. Naval battle in Congress. Is 
the navy large enough? 

Outlook, 89:839-42, Aug. 15, 1908. Navy for peace. R. F. Zogbaum. 

Outlook. 89:731-2, Aug. 1, 1908. Uncle Sam's peace insurance. 

Outlook. 91:386-7, Feb. 20, 1909, Do we need a navy? 

24 



Reader, 10:339-43, Sept., 1907. Why the nations cannot disarm. 

A, S. Hershey. 
World's Work, 20:13318-22, Auff., 1910. Two hindrances in peace. G. 
World Today, 16:389-94, April, 1909. What our navy costs us. L. 

A. Mead. 
World's Work, 20:13318-22, Aug-., 1910.Tw ohindrances in peace. G. 

W. Eliot. 



CAPITAL PUNISHMENT 



Hjigh School Reference Books: 

See list of general reference books, and files of Oregonian. 
Brief si ^and Bibliographies: 

Askew, J. B. Pros and cons. 1906. Lond. Routledge, p. 34-5. 

Brookings, W. D. & Ringwalt, R. C. Briefs for debate. 1895. 
Longmans, p. 57-59. 

Matson, H. References for literary workers. 1892. McClurg, 
p. 160-1. 

Robbins, E. C. High school debate book. 1911. McClurg, 
p. 44-7. 

Fanning, C. E., comp. Selected articles on capital punishment. 
1909. Wilson. (Debaters' handbook series.) Bibliography, p. 
1-8. 

Jerome, W. M. comp. Syllabus on capital punishment. 
Books and Pamphlets: 

Evans, S. E. Abolition of capital punishment. 

Massachusetts civic alliance, Boston. Does capital punishment in- 
crease murder? (Statistics on abuse of the pardon power.) 

National Prison Association. Proceedings. 

There are many discussions and addresses upon the subject of Capital 
punishment published in the proceedings of this Association, and these vol- 
umes are to be found in most public libraries. We especially note the 
articles in the proceedings for 1889, 1894, 1896, 1897, and 1898. 

Neff, P. J. Capital punishment. 1912. Pub. by the author, Med- 
ford, Oregon. 

New Jersey. Legislature. Senate comniittee to inquire into the 
subject of capital punishment. Report. 1908. 

New York (State). Commissioners on capital punishment. Report. 
1888. (Also additional report 1892.) 

Ohio. State Library. Bulletin, v. 1, No. 10, January 1906. (Bibli- 
ography, p. 3-6.) 

Oregon. Initiative petition, 1912. A bill for an act to abolish 
capital punishment as a penalty for conviction of murder in the 
first degree; to substitute therefor life imprisonment at hard la- 
bor. To regulate the pardoning power of the governor and to 
amend Section 1903 and Section 1714 of Lord's Oregon laws. 

Oregon League to Abolish Capital Punishment. Publications. 

The Oregon Library Commission has a supply of the pamphlets and 
leaflets published by this League and will include them in shipments of 
Capital punishment material when it is loaned to schools, or, they may be 
obtained by addressing the Secretary, Box 372, Salem, Oregon. 

Oregon. State Penitentiary. Biennial report, 1911, p. 9-10. 

Prison Reform League. Crime and criminals, edited by J. G. Grif- 
fiths. 1910. Published by Prison Reform League Publishing 
Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Shaler, N. S. Citizen. 1904. Barnes, p. 125-8. 

Society of Friends. Address on Capital punishment: an address 
of the representatives of the religious Society of friends for 

25 



Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, issued Dec. 18, 1908. 
Friends Book Store, 304 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Whitlock, Brand. Thou shalt not kill. (Reprinted from Reader, 9: 

382-9. March, 1907.) 
This article has also been reprinted by the Oregon League to Abolish 
Capital Punishment, and may be obtained through the Oregon Library Com- 
mission, or by addressing the Secretary, Box 372, Salem, Oregon. 

Wines, F. H. Punishment and reformation: a study of the penitenti- 
ary system. 1909. Crowell. 
Periodical Articles. 

Albany Law Journal, 69:213-14. June, 1907. Abolition of death 
penalty. 

American Journal of Politics, 2:323-32. March, 1893. Capital pun- 
ishment, .. . 

American Law Review, 43:321-24. May, June, 1909. Does capital 
punishment prevent convictions? Maynard Shipley. 

American Law Review, 43:667-84. 1909. Capital punishment. B. 
G. Kendall. 

American Statistical Association Quarterly, 9:307-14. S. 1905. 
Results of the practical abolition of capital punishment in Bel- 
gium. Maynard Shipley. 

Annals American Academy, 29:601-29. May, 1907. Crime and cap- 
ital punishment, symposium. 

Arena, 1:75-83. Jan., 1890. Crime of capital punishment. H. 0. 
Pentecost. 

Arena, 2:513-23. Oct. 1890. Death penalty. G. F. Shrady. 

Arena, 21:469-72. April, 1899. Failure of the death penalty. C. 
G. Garrison. 

Arena, 38:259-63. S., 1907. Anomaly of capital punishment. T. 
S. Moseby. 

Arena, 51:525-34. Aug-., 1909. I cannot keep still; capital punish- 
ment in Russia. L. N. Tolstoi. 

Canada Law Journal, 47:1-4. Jan. 2, 1911. Should capital punish- 
ment be abolished? W. E. O'Brien. 

Charities, 15:248-9. Nov. 18, 1905. Capital punishment denounced. 

Charities, 15:732-33. Feb. 24, 1906. Capital punishment in Belgium. 

Charities, 17:1103. March 23, 1907. Death penalty in Maine. E. P. 
Wheeler. 

Charities, 18:193-4. May 11, 1907. Death Penalty. E. P. Wheeler. 

Collier's, April 8, 1907, Capital punishment will go. 

Current Literature, 29:190-92. Aug., 1900. Shall hanging end? 
J. Oldfield. 

Forum, 3:381-91. June, 1887. Capital punishment. J. M. Buckley. 

Green Bag, 19:359-60. July, 1907. Abolition of capital punishment. 
J. H. Vahey. 

Harper's Weekly, 48:196-98. Feb. 6, 1904. State manslaughter. 
W. D. Howells. 

Harper's Weekly, 50:1028-29. July 21, 1906. Does capital punish- 
ment tend to diminish capital crime? T. S. Mosby. 

Harper's Weekly, 50:1903. Dec. 29, 1906. Plato on capital pun- 
ishment. M. Shipley. 

Harper's Weekly, 51:890. June 15, 1907. Homicide and the death 
penalty in France. M. Shipley. 

Harper's Weekly, 53:8. July 3, 1909. Should capital punishment 
be abolished? Charles Spitzka. 

Independent, 61:1124-25. Nov. 8, 1909. Abolishing the death pen- 
alty in France. 

26 



Literary Digest, 35:953-4. Dec. 21, 1907. Scientific reasons for 
the death penalty. 

Literary Digest, 38:203. Feb. 6, 1909. Death penalty restored in 
France. 

Literary Digest, 38:244. Feb. 13, 1909. Why the guillotine came 
back. 

Living Age, 258:349-57. Aug. 8, 1908. Government by executions. 
L. N. Tolstoi. 

Nation, 84:376-7. April 25, 1907. Whitely case and the death pen- 
alty. 

Nineteenth Century, 72:732-44. Oct.. 1912. Capital punishment: 
the case for abolition. A. F. Schuster. 

Outlook, 85:335-7. Feb. 16, 1907. America and the sixth command- 
ment. 

Outlook, 90:1-3. Sept. 5, 1908. The Russian torture chamber. 

Outlook, 93:518, Oct. 30, 1909. In darkest Russia. A. E. Golden- 
meiser. 

Outlook, 97:707. April 1, 1911. The case of Andrew Toth. 

Review of Reviews, 40:219-20. Aug., 1909. Does capital punish- 
ment prevent convictions ? 



IMMIGRATION. 
High School Reference Books: 

U. S. Bureau of immigration and naturalization. Annual reports 

U. S. Bureau of statistics. Statistical abstract of the United States. 
1912. 

U. S. Congress. Immigration documents. 

U. S. Congressional records. Speeches on immigration (especially 
those of 1912 and 1913). 

U. S. Immigration commission. Abstract of reports. 

U. S. Immigration commission. Annual reports. Wash.,' Govt. See 
also list of general reference books. 
Briefs and Bibliographies: 

Brookings, W. D. & Ringwalt, R. C. Briefs for debate. 1895, Long- 
man's, p. 68-73. 

Lyman, R. L. & Baker, J. E. Principles of effective debating. Mad- 
ison. University. 1907. (Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin. Series No. 176, Extension Series No. 1.) 

Pearson, P. M. comp. Intercollegiate debates. 1909. Hinds, p. 
165-87. 

Ringwalt, R. C. Briefs on public questions. 1905. Longmans, p. 
31-41. 

Robbins, E. C. High school debate book. 1911. McClurg, p. 100- 
108. 

Wisconsin. University. Extension division. Restriction of immi- 
gration. 2d ed. Madison. University. 1912. (Bulletin, Gen. 
Ser. No. 360.) 
Books and Pamphlets: 

Commons, J. R. Races and immigrants in America. 1907. Mac- 
millan. 

Dillingham, W. P. Regulation of immigration: speech in the Senate 
of the United States, April 17, 1912. (From Congressional 
record. 62d Cong., 2d sess.) 

Hall, P. F. Immigration and its effects upon the United States. 
2d ed. rev. 1906. Holt. 

Immigration restriction league, Boston. Publications. 

27 



Jenks, J. W. & Lauck, W. J. The immigration problem. 1511. Funk. 

Keefe, D. J. Operation of present immigration law. Wash., 1913. 
(63d Cong., 1st sess.. Sen. doc. No, 52.) 

National liberal immigration league. New York City. Publications. 

Smith, R. Mayo. Emigration and immigration: a study in social 
science. 1890. Scribner. 

Sulzberger, C. L. Is immigration a menace? 1912. New York, 
American Jewish committee. 

U. S. Census Office. Thirteenth census. Wash., Govt. 

U. S. 63d Congress, 1st session. Senate. A bill to regulate the 
immigration of aliens to, and the residence of aliens in the 
United States. Senate bill 2406. (The Dillingham bill.) 

Warne, F. J. The immigration invasion. 1913. Dodd. 
Periodical Articles: 

American Educational Review, 1:753-65. Dec, 1911. Immigration 
and crises. H. P. Fairchild. 

North American Review, 195:665-72. May, 1912. The lesson from 
Lawrence. W. J. Lanck. 

Outlook, 101:383-4. June 22, 1912. Sifting the immigrants. (Ed- 
itorial.) 

Outlook, 101:453-4. June 22, 1912. Sifting the immigrant. J. H. 
Patten. 

Outlook, 101:454. June 22, 1912. Selecting the immigrant. W. B. 
Griffith. 

World's Work, 26:257-8. July, 1913. To restrict immigration. (Ed- 
itorial.) 



Constitutic^n and By-Laws 

OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

ARTICLE I. 

NAME. 

This organization shall be known as the Oregon High School De- 
bating League. 

ARTICLE II. 

OBJECT. 

The object of this League is improvement in debate among the 
students in the high schools of the State of Oregon. 

ARTICLE III. 
MEMBERSHIP. 

Section 1. Any public high school in Oregon which maintains a 
debating society throughout the year may become a member of this 
League upon application to the Executive Committee of the League and 
shall retain such membership so long as it conforms to the constitution 
and by-laws. 

Section 2. All schools seeking admission for any particular year 
must join by October 15th of that year. 

28 



Section 3. The annual dues of three dollars shall be paid to the 
Treasurer by October 15th. Failure to pay dues shall cancel member- 
ship. 

ARTICLE IV, 

OFFICERS, COMMITTEES, DUTIES. 

Section 1. The officers of the League shall be a President and a 
Secretary-Treasurer, They shall be elected at the annual meeting. 

Section 2. The executive committee of the League shall consist 
of the President and the Secretary, who shall act with the State Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction, the President of the University of 
Oregon and the Secretary of the Oregon Library Commission. This 
committee shall have power to increase its membership by two addi- 
tional members, one of whom shall be a county superintendent. 

Section 3. (a) It shall be the duty of the President to /preside at 
the annual meeting, and at the final contest, and, when necessary, to 
call meetings of the executive committee. 

(b) It shall be the duty of the Secretary-Treasurer to keep minutes 
of the annual meeting, and of the meetings of the executive committee, 
to disburse funds upon order of the executive committee, to collect 
annual dues and perform other duties pertaining to the office. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee: 

To pair the district champion teams, to choose sides and to make 
other arrangements for the inter-district contests, on the basis of con- 
district and final debates shall begin before the conclusion of the 
district debates, and the Secretary shall submit the schedule to the 
executive committee before it becomes final. 

To co-operate with the two directors, whose districts shall be repre- 
sented in the final contest, in making arrangements for that contest. 

To select the questions for debate for the inter-district and final 
contests; also for the districts in all but the first preliminaries. In 
no case, however, shall the State and inter-district question be used as 
an intra-district question. 

To prepare and have printed each year, before December 1st, a 
year book containing the latest revision of the constitution and by-laws, 
the list of names and addresses of the officers, statement of question 
for district, inter-district and final contests, with bibliography, and 
such other matter as, in their judgment, may be helpful to the mem- 
bers of the League. 

Section 4. The executive committee shall appoint for each district 
one director who shall be the principal (or other representative) of 
the League high schools in his district. 

It shall be the duty of the director: 

To preside at the call meetings of the principals (or other rep- 
resentatives) of the League high schools in his district. 

To co-operate with the principals (or other representatives) of the 
League high schools in his district, in pairing the schools, and in making 
other arrangements for the several series of district contests on the 
basis of convenience and expense. In case of disagreement the district 
director shall have final authority in pairing teams. 

To file with the secretary of the League, for permanent record, 
and for the reference of the Executive Committee, not later than 
November 5th, an approved schedule of the debates for his district. 
He shall report to the Secretary the results of all contests immediately 
after they shall have been held, giving the names of the contesting 
schools and their representatives, together with the votes of the judges. 
No debate shall be considered as having been held under the auspices 

29 



of the League unless the schedule shall have been filed with the 
Secretary as above directed, and the results immediately reported. 

To furnish the executive committee all other necessary informa- 
tion with regard to the working's of the League in his district. 

ARTICLE V. 

MEETINGS, ELECTIONS. 

Section 1. The directors in the several districts shall, at any time 
they deem it necessary, call meetings of the principals (other repre- 
sentatives) of the league high schools in their respective diistricts. 

Section 2. The annual meeting shall be held at the time of the 
State Teachers' Association. At this meeting the ofRcerls shall be 
elected, _each for a period of one year. Each league high school shall 
be entitled to only one vote. 

ARTICLE VI. 

DEBATING DISTRICTS. 

The State shall be divided into debating districts by the executive 
board of the League. 

ARTICLE VII. 

CONTESTS. 

Section 1. District Contests The district contests, held by teams 
representing the several high schools within each district, shall occur 
between the first of November and the first of February. The team 
winning in the last series of these contests shall be the district champion 
team. The triangular system of debate is urged wherever conditions 
permit, leaving the method of grouping by twos in other cases. 

Section 2. Inter-District Contests. The inter-district contests, held 
by the several district champion teams, shall occur between the first 
of March and the first of May. The two teams winning in these con- 
tests shall be the two inter-district champion teams. 

Section 3. Final Contest. The final contest, held by the two inter- 
district champion teams, shall be held at the University of Oregon 
at a time to be fixed by the executive committee. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Section 1. The debaters shall be undergraduate students of the 
schools which they represent, and shall have passing grades to date 
in at least three subjects that they are taking at the time of the contest. 

Section 2. The team that shall represent any league high school 
shall be selected by a series of try-outs. In cases where this seems 
impracticable a different method may be used when authorized by the 
executive committee. Without such permission the team selected in 
any other manner shall not be considered eligible to the district debates. 

Section 3. At all contests the debaters shall be separated from 
the audience and shall receive no coaching while the debate is in 
progress. 

Section 4. At all contests, in which each team shall be repre- 
sented by three members, the time and order of the speeches shall be 
as follows: 

First speaker, affirmative, 12 minutc|s (irftroduction and direct 
argument). 

First speaker, negative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refut- 
ation). 

30 



Second speaker, affirmative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Second speaker, negative, 12 minutes (direct ar^ment and refu- 
tation). 

Third speaker, affirmative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Third speaker, negative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Closer, negative, 6 minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, 6 minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Section 5. At all contests, in which each team shall be repre- 
S'ented by two members, the time and order of the speeches shall be 
as follows: 

First speaker, affirmative, 15 minutes (introduction and direct ar- 
gument). 

First speaker, negative. 15 minutes (direct argument and refuta- 
tion). 

Second speaker, affirmative, 15 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Second speaker, negative, 15 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Closer, negative, 6 minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, 6 minutes, (rebuttal and summary). 

No new argument allowed in either of the last two speeches. 

Section 6. There shall be no cheering while any debater is speak- 
ing and the chairman or presiding officer shall make this announce- 
ment before the debate and shall use all means to enforce the rule. 
In cases of cheering, time so consumed may be made up to the speaker 
at the discretion of the chairman or presiding officer. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Section 1. At each contest there shall be three judges selected 
on the basis of capabilitv and impartiality; and so far as possible, 
they shall be non-local. The principals of any two contesting schools 
may by mutual agreement, however, decide upon one judge to deter- 
mine the issue, provided that three judges must be selected in all cases 
where the principals cannot agree upon one judge. 

Section 2. The judges for inter-district debates shall be appointed 
by the executive committee, but in no case shall a member of said 
committee take part in the selection of judges in a case where he is 
personally interested. For the district contests, the principals of the 
two schools represented shall select the judges as follows: The prin- 
cipal of the visiting school shall submit a list of nine judges to the 
home school, from which to select three. If less than this number are 
satisfactory, the principal of the home school shall present a like list 
for selection, and so on until three mutually satisfactory judges are 
selected. The consideration of judges shall be taken up a month or 
more before the contest, and if possible, the final selection shall be 
made not less than a week before the debate. 

Section 3. As soon as the judges shall be selected, they shall be 
supplied each with a copy of "How to Judge a Debate." Copies can 
be secured from the district directors or from the Secretary of the 
League. 

Section 4. During the debate the judges shall sit apart from 
one another. They shall take into consideration argument, rebuttal, 
and effectiveness, and shall base their decision on the merits of the 

31 



debate and not on the merits of the question. Each judge at the con- 
clusion of the contest, without consultation with any other judge, shall 
write on a card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal it in an 
envelope, and deliver it to the presiding officer, who shall open the 
envelopes in sight of the two leaders, and then announce to the audi- 
ence the decision. 

The following score card shall be handed each judge, for his private 
use, and shall not be handed in with the judge's final vote: 

(FACE) 

SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE. 



^Not to be handed in with vote.) 



Affirmative 

First Speaker .... 
Second Speaker 
Third Speaker .... 
Total 



Argumen t 



Rebuttal 



Negative 



First Speaker 



Argumen t 



Second Speaker 
Third Speaker ... 



Rebuttal 



Effective- 
ness 



Effective- 
ness 



Total 



Total 



Total 

N. B. The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more 
than 100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of 
the three divisions: Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 

(BACK) 

INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES. 
I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the 
conclusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a sep- 
arate card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an en- 
velope and hand to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be 
given credit for rebuttal. 
III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered 
and its skillful use in the discussion. 



32 



Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 
Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleas- 
ing delivery. 
IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on 
the merits of the question. 
V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 

ARTICLE X. 

Expenses. 

Section 1. In all triangular and dual contests, both district and 
inter-district, in which each school is represented by an affirmative and 
a negative team, the expenses of the judges, and the hotel bills and 
railway mileage of the visiting teams (the three — or two, as the case 
may be — debaters and one member of the high school faculty j shall be 
pooled and borne equally by the competing schools. Immediately after 
each contest, each school shall submit an itemized account of its ex- 
penses to the Director of the District, or some one appointed by him. 
The director shall add the total expenses, divide them proportionately, 
and make such collections and reimbursements as may be necessary to 
effect an equitable adjustment of expense burdens. In all contests 
which involve a single debate, the principals of competing schools 
shall mutually agree upon an equitable division of expenses. The con- 
sideration of this question shall be taken up a month or more before 
the contest. If a satisfactory agreement shall not have been reached 
at least two weeks before the contest, the question shall be referred 
to the district director for final adjudication and settlement. In case 
the school of any district may be able to agree upon some other more 
satisfactory system, they shall not be bound by this section in their 
intra-district contests. 

Section 2. Whenever two competing teams may find it more con- 
venient or less expensive to meet at some half-way point, the two 
schools represented by these teams shall share equally the expense, or 
make some special arrangements for defraying the expenses of that 
particular debate. 

Section 3. At the final contest the University shall pay the ex- 
penses of the judges and the hotel bills and traveling expenses of the 
two teams. 

ARTICLE XI, 

AMENDMENTS. 

This constitution and by-laws may be amended at any annual meet- 
ing by a majority of the league high schools present. But no school 
shall have more than one vote. Amendments may also be made at any 
time by majority vote of the executive committee, subject to ratifica- 
tion at the next annual meeting. 

BY-LAWS. 

1. It shall be considered improper to entertain judges before the 
contest at any place other than the hotel. 

2. After arrangements for any preliminary debate are concluded, 
the statement of the question for debate may be changed with the 
consent of the teams concerned. But the team desiring the change 
must re-state the question and secure the consent of the other team. 

33 



3. It shall be considered dishonorable for one school to visit the 
debates of another school when these two schools are likely to meet 
on the same quqestion. 

4. It shall be considered dishonorable for any debater, in any 
manner, to plag'airize his speech. 

5. The question for intra-district debates shall be the District 
Question selected by the executive committee, or, it may be a question 
selected by the principals of the contesting schools; but in no cage 
shall an intra-district question be the same as the State and Inter- 
District Question, unless specially authorized by the executive com- 
mittee. These restrictions do not apply to try-outs within the school. 

6. The Inter-District Question shall be the same as the Sta,te 
Question. 

7. Counties with less than seventy-flve high school students regis- 
tered in all the schools of the county may enter the League with a 
team selected by a series of try-outs from all the high schools of the 
county. 

8. The "University of Oregon Cup" shall become the permanent 
property of the school winning it three times. A "League Cup" shall 
be given to the school failing to hold the "University of Oregon Cup" 
a second year, said "League Cup" to be held permanently by the school. 

9. Each school shall appoint a timekeeper. The two timekeepers 
shall sit directly in front of the speakers, and shall enforce the time 
limit and shall give such warning as the leader of each team shall 
direct. 



34 



r 



3a. <iu,^ b 



v>\ 2_UNIVERSITY OF REGON BULLETIN 



New Series 



NOVEMBER, 1914 



Vol. XII, No. 3 



Oregon High School 
Debating League 



ROBERT W. PRESCOTT 
Assistant Professor of Public Speaking 



mmM 




Published monthly by the University of Oregon, and entered at the postoffice in 
Eugene, Oregon, as second-class matter. 



OREGON 

HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING 

LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE YEAR 

1914-15 



List of Officers 

Proposition for Debate with Bibliography 

Debate Libraries 

Constitution and By-Laws 



Prepared by 

ROBERT W. PRESCOTT 

Secretary of the League 

Assistant Professor of Public Spraking 

University of Oregon 






Eugene, Oregon 
1914 



■Hti^^Jr' 




UNIVERSITY OF OREGON CUP 
Given by the Laurean and Eutaxian Literary Societies and Professor E. E. 
DeCou, organizer of tlie League, to stimulate debating among the high scliools 
of the State. It is presented annually to the winning team and becomes the 
permanent property of the school winning it three times. 

Won by Albany, .lune 1, 1912. Won by North Bena, Mav 8, 1913. 

Won by Pendleton, May 7, 1914. 
THE REGENTS CUP, in the permanent possession of Grants Pass. 
Won by Lebanon, May 29, 1908. Won by Grants Pass, Juotj.i, .lWi?,,n«» 

Won by Pendleton, June 3, 1910. Won by Grants Pass, Jui%|f|, UBHAni 



Of THE 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 





^^^^^^^HI^^^^^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HII^^^I 


^^^H 






^^^^^^^ 




*. ^"S-^^^^^ 






^H' '9 ^1 


1 P' 




^M i' 1 


P\.J 




^^P ^' 


^^^m^^^-- :^^ 



Vernal G. Bag km an 



Clarence Bean 



PENDLETON DEBATING TEAM 



Winner Umatilla District Championship; defeated Baker, winner Eastern 
Oregon Championship; defeated Astoria, winner of Lower and Upper Columbia 
River Championships ; defeated Oregon City, winning State Championship at 
Villard Hall, University of Oregon, May 7, 1914. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

OFFICERS 

For the year 1913-1914 

R. W. Kirk, Superintendent of Schools, Corvallis, President 

Robert W. Prescott, Assistant Professor of Public Speaking, University 
of Oregon, Eugene. Secretary-Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

P. L. Campbell, President University of Oregon, Eugene 

J. A. Churchill, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Salem 

R. W. Kirk, Superintendent of Schools, Corvallis 

Cornelia Marvin, Secretary Oregon State Library, Salem 

Robert W. Prescott, University of Oregon, Eugene 

District Directors 

Harold Hopkins, Superintendent of Schools, Bandon 
Director Coos Bay District 

Charles Olson, Principal of High School, La Grande 
Director Eastern Oregon District 

F. J. Tooze, Superintendent of Schools, Oregon City 
Director Northern Willamette District 

Geo. A. Briscoe, Superintendent of Schools, Ashland 
Director Southern Oregon District 

R. L. Kirk, Superintendent of Schools, Springfield 
Director Southern Willamette District 

J. G. Imel, Superintendent of Schools, Astoria 
Director Lower Columbia River District 

J. S. Landers, Superintendent of Schools, Pendleton 
Director Umatilla District 

H. C. Baughman, Superintendent of Schools, Prineville 
Director Upper Columbia River District 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 




Wm. Miller 



Elbert Charman 



OREGON CITY DEBATING TEAM 



Winner of Northern Willamette Championship ; defeated Albany, winner 
of Southern Willamette Championship ; defeated Klamath Falls, winner of 
Southern Oregon and Coos Bay Championships. Defeated by Pendleton for 
State Championship. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 



WINNERS OF DISTRICT AND INTER-DISTRICT 
DEBATES 

Umatilla District — Pendleton winner Umatilla District Championship; 
defeated Baker, winner Eastern Oregon Championship; defeated 
Astoria, winner of Lower and Upper Columbia River Championship; 
defeated Oregon City, winner State Championship at Villard Hall, 
University of Oregon, May 7, 1914. 

Northern AVillamette District — Oregon City winner of Northern Wil- 
lamette Championship; defeated Albany, winner of Southern Wil- 
lamette Championship; defeated Klamath Falls, winner of South- 
ern Oregon and Coos Bay Championship. Defeated by Pendleton 
for State Championship. 

Lower Columbia River District — Astoria defeated The Dalles, winner 
Upper Columbia River District. Defeated by Pendleton in State 
Semi Finals. 

Southern Oregon District — Klamath Falls winner Southern Oregon 
Championship; defeated Marshfield, champions of Coos Bay Dis- 
trict. Defeated by Oregon City in State Semi Finals. 

Upper Columbia River District — The Dalles champions of the Upper 
Columbia River District. 

Eastern Oregon District — Baker champions of Eastern Oregon District. 

Southern Willamette District — Albany champions of Southern Willam- 
ette District. 

Coos Bay District — Marshfield champions of Coos Bay District. 



DISTRICTS OF STATE DEBATING LEAGUE 
BY COUNTIES, 1914-1915 

Coos Bay District — Supt. Harold Hopkins, Bandon, Director. Coos 
and Curry Counties. 

Eastern Oregon District — Principal Chas. Olson, La Grande, Director. 
Union, Wallowa, Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties. 

Lower Columbia District — Supt. J. G. Imel, Astoria, Director. Tilla- 
mook, Clatsop, Columbia and Multnomah Counties. 

Northern Willamette District — Supt. F. J. Tooze, Oregon City, Direc- 
tor. Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, Polk and Marion Counties. 

Southern Oregon District — Supt. Geo. A. Briscoe, Ashland, Director. 
Josephine, Jackson, Klamath and Lake Counties. 

Southern Willamette District — Supt. R. L. Kirk, Springfield, Director. 
Lincoln, Benton, Linn, Lane and Douglas Counties. 

Umatilla District — Supt. J. S. Landers, Pendleton, Director. Umatilla, 
Morrow, Gilliam and Wheeler Counties. 

Upper Columbia River District — Supt. H. C. Baughman, Prineville, 
Director. Hood River, Wasco, Sherman and Crook Counties. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 



MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE 1913-1914 



Albany 

Ashland 

Astoria 

Baker 

Bandon 

Corvallis 

Dayton 

Estacada 

Eugene 

Forest Grove 

Gresham 



Junction City 
Klamath Falls 
La Grande 
Lebanon 
Marshfield 
McMinnville 
Myrtle Point 
Newburg 
North Bend 
Oregon City 
Parkplace 



Pendleton 

Prineville 

Salem 

Springfield 

St. Helens 

St. Johns 

The Dalles 

Tillamook 

Union 

Weston 

Woodburn 



SCHOOLS BY DISTRICTS 

Eastern Oregon — Baker, Union, La Grande. 

Umatilla — Pendleton, Weston. 

Upper Columbia River — The Dalles, Prineville. 

Lower Columbia River — Astoria, Tillamook, St. Helens, Gresham, 
St. Johns. 

Northern AVillamette — Salem, Oregon City, Parkplace, Estacada, New- 
burg, McMinnville, Dayton, Forest Grove, Woodburn. 

Lower AVillamette — Junction City, Albany, Lebanon, Corvallis, Spring- 
field, Eugene. 

Coos Bay — -Bandon, Myrtle Point, Marshfield, North Bend. 

Southern Oregon — Ashland, Klamath Palls. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 



1914-15 QUESTION FOR DEBATE 

Resolved, That the Federal Government should own and operate 
all interstate railroads acting as common carriers, including intrastate 
lines competing with them, constitutionality waived. 

AIDS FOR DEBATERS 

A list of books recommended by the State Library for high school libraries. 
'I'hf prices in parentheses are the "school prices" from the State School 
Library List. 

Parliamentary Practice : 

Robert. Rules of Order. Scott. 7 5c (49c). 

Palmer. New Parliamentary Manual. Hinds, Noble and Eldridge. 

Gregg. Parliamentary Law. Ginn. 

Gaines. The New Gushing Manual of Parliamentary Practice. 

Thompson Brown. 
Robert. Primer of Parliamentary Law. Doubleday. 75c (4 8c). 

Public Speaking: 

Clark & Blanchard. Practical Public Speaking. Scribner. $1.00 

(85c). 
Everts. The Speaking Voice; Principles of Training Simplified and 

Condensed. Harper. $1.00 (85c). 
Shurter. Extempore speaking for school and college. Ginn. 90c 

(77c). 

Debating : 

Gardner. The Making of Arguments. Ginn. - 

Alden. Art of Debate. Holt. $1.12 ($1.00). 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg. Debate Index. 2d ed. Pittsburg 
Carnegie Library. 20c. 

An index to the debaters' manuals in the Carnegie Library, Pittsburg. 

Foster. Argumentation and Debating. Houghton. $1.25 ($1.07). 
Contains specimen briefs and debates and a list of propositions for 
debate for advanced students. 

Foster. Essentialsof Exposition and Argument. Houghton. 1911. 90c. 
The best book upon the subject. Based upon his argumentation and 
debating. 

Laycock & Scales. Argumentation and Debate. Macmillan. $1.10 
(95c). 

A good exposition of the principles of debating. More advanced 
than the book below. 

Laycock & Spofford. Manual of Argumentation for High Schools 
and Academies. Macmillan. 5 0c (42c). 
Excellent book for beginners. 

Thomas. Manual of Debate. American Book Co. 80c. 
Intended as a drill book for beginners. 

Wisconsin. University. Extension Division, How to Judge a 

Debate. University of Wisconsin. 10c. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. Principles of Effective 

Debating. 3d ed. Wilson. 15c. 



10 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 

Questions with Briefs: 

Brookings & Ringwalt. Briefs for Debate on Current Political, 
Economic and Social Topics. 1895. Longmans. $1.25 (90c). 
Note preface on "The Art of Debate." 

Carpenter. Debate Outlines on Public Questions. New ed. Broad- 
way Pub. Co. $1.00. 

Ringwalt. Briefs on Public Questions. Longmans. $1.20 (95c). 

Robbins. High School Debate Book. McClurg. $1.00 (90c). 
Excellent for beginners. 

Periodical Articles: 

Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature. 1900-1904. Wilson. 
$16 ($8). 

1905-1909. Wilson. $24 ($12). 

Annual Volumes, 1910-date. Wilson. $7 ($3.50). 

A file of some of the best periodicals is desirable, and a team 
which is constantly debating public questions must have access to 
the current numbers of the Outlook and Nation. Indexes to current 
magazines and newspapers are essential. All available indexes are 
owned by the Commission, and will be consulted for any subject, 
upon request. It is possible that many of the magazine references 
may be borrowed from the people of the different towns. Articles 
indexed in the publications noted above may be rented from the 
H. W. Wilson Co., of Minneapolis. Cost of first article in each order 
is 10c, and for each additional article ordered at same time, 5c. 

Government Documents:- — -(Apply to Department or Congressman.) 
The library should have a file of the reports and bulletins of the 
Labor Bureau; sets of reports of the Department of Commerce 
and Labor; a set of publications of last census; the Statistical 
Abstract; the last Official Directory; Consular reports (with 
indexes); recent volumes of Congressional Record; Presidents' 
messages; Industrial Commission report (difficult to secure); 
other sets should be secured for special needs — Reports of 
Commissioner of Immigration for debate on that subject, etc. 

Indexes to Government Document: 

Write to Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C, for the 
following: 

Catalog of Public Documents of the 5 3d-60th Congress and all 
Departments of the Government, March 4, 1893-June 30, 1901, 
Vols. 1-9. 

Tables of annotated indexes to the Congressional Series of United 
States public documents. 1902. 

Index to the subjects of the documents and reports and to the com- 
mittees, senators and representatives presenting them, with 
tables of the same in numerical order, being the "Consolidated 
Index" provided for by the Act of January 12, 1895. 54th Con- 
gress. 1st Session. December, 1895-date. 

Check list of United States public documents, 1789-1909. 3d Ed. 
Vol. 2, not yet published, will be an index to Vol. 1. 

Monthly catalog. United States public documents. $1.10 a year. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 11 



State Documents: 

Every high school should have recent Oregon State documents, and 
particularly the Oregon Blue Book, and the annual report of 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics. For lists of recent publications 
of the various states the monthly list of publications, which 
may be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Wash- 
ington, D. C, for 5 0c a year, is most useful. 

Almanacs and Yearbooks: (The last annual issue for each is given.) 
American Year Book, 1912, Appleton. $3.50 ($3.30 incl. postage). 

Especially useful in the fields of economics, political science, 

public works, legislation, commerce, politics and government. 
Brittanica Year Book, 1913. Encyclopedia Brittanica Co. $1.75. 

The first volume issued. Historical and statistical, covering the 

years 1910-12. 
Chicago Daily News Almanac and Year Book, 1913. Chicago Daily 

News. 45c. 
New International Year Book, 1913. Dodd. $5. Contains very 

full articles on all events of importance during the year and on 

all subjects that have been marked by change or progress. 
Tribune Almanac, 1913. New York Tribune. 25c. 
World Almanac and Encyclopedia, 1913. New York Press Pub. 

Co. 35c. 

General : 

Bliss. Encyclopedia of Social Reform. Funk. $7.50 ($5.65). 

Encyclopedias : 

References are not given to these, but it is assumed that debaters 
will look up all questions in the New International and Brittan- 
ica cyclopedias. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 



OREGON STATE LIBRARY DEBATE LIBRARIES 

These collections of material upon public questions are loaned with- 
out charge to Oregon schools upon proper application. This means 
that the application must be made by the principal, or by the teacher 
who is in charge of the debate work. Loans are made through public 
libraries when possible, as it is generally considered better to supple- 
ment public library collections so that schools shall not pay cost of 
transportation upon material which is to be had locally, and shall not 
deprive other schools of this. The rules for debate library loans may 
be had upon application. The period of the loati is three weeks with 
possible renewal for two weeks if the material is not desired elsewhere. 
It is better for schools to apply for small libraries to be kept a short 
time, rather than to ask for complete libraries which cannot profitably 
be used in so short a time. No loans are made to schools which mark 
the books and pamphlets and return them in bad condition. The fine 
for keeping libraries beyond time is 25c a day. Privileges of the library 
are withdrawn in case of loss of pieces. 

The State Library makes every effort to meet the needs of the 
schools, but it has many borrowers among schools and debating socie- 
ties and can do justice to all of them only by enforcing the rules 
strictly. A new list of questions for debate will soon be issued, giving 
the titles of the books which high school debating societies should 
collect. 

The University of Oregon Library, Eugene, will also be able to 
furnish some reading material on the question of Government Owner- 
ship of Railroads to members of the League. Make enquiries of the 
Librarian, Mr. M. H. Douglas. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 13 



BIBLIOGRAPHY ON THE GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP 

OF RAILWAYS 

This bibliography contains a selection of the more important books 
on the government ownership of railways, but does not give references 
to periodical articles or government documents. The Bureau of Rail- 
way Economics, 1329 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D. C, has pub- 
lished a very complete bibliography on the subject, and a copy of 
this has been sent to every public library in the State. The most 
useful book for debaters is "Selected Articles on Government Owner- 
ship of Railroads," compiled by Edith M. Phelps, and published by 
the H. W. Wilson Co., White Plains, N. Y. This contains briefs, 
bibliographies, and selected articles, covering both sides of the question. 
The files of the Congressional Record during the debates on the Alas- 
kan railroad, the Stateman's Year Book, which gives the latest statis- 
tics of railroads in various countries, and the Readers' Guide, an index 
to current periodicals, published by the H. W. Wilson Co., should be 
in every library. 

Libraries should have as many as possible of the books listed 
below. Magazine articles, and other material not easily secured may 
be borrowed from the State Library. 



BRIEFS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES 

Askew, J. D. — Railway Nationalization. (In Pros and Cons, 1911. 
p. 195). 

Brookings, W. D. and Ringwalt, R. C. — Government Ownership of 
Railroads. (In Briefs for Debate. 1895. pp. 123-26.) 

Bureau of Railway Economics, Washington, D. C. — List of publications 
pertaining to Government Ownership of Railways. 1914. (Bul- 
letin No. 62.) 

Intercollegiate Debates — 1903-1914. Vol. 1, p. 147; Vol. 4, p. 255. 

Matson, Henry — Should the Government Own and Operate the Rail- 
roads? (In References for Literary Workers. 18 93. p. 17 6.) 

Phelps, E. M. — Selected articles on Government Ownership of Rail- 
roads. See below. 

Ringwalt, R. C. — Government Ownership of Railways. (In Briefs on 
Public Questions. 1905. p. 163.) 

Robbins, E. C. — Government Ownership of Railways. (In High School 
Debate Book. 1911. p. 88.) 

Shurter, F. D. and Taylor, C. C. — Government Ownership of Railroads 
in the U. S. is Desirable. (In Both Sides of 100 Public Questions. 
1913. p. 73.) 

Thomas, R. W. — The Federal Government should Own and Operate the 
Railroads in the United States. (In Manual of Debate. 1910. 
p. 180.) 



14 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 

RECENT AND IMPORTANT BOOKS 

American Telephone and Telegraph Company — Brief of Arguments 

Against Public Ownership. 3 Vol. Authors. 1913. 
Dunn, S. O. — Government Ownership of Railways. Appleton. 1913. 

$1.50. 
Elliott, Howard — The Truth About the Railroads. Houghton. 1913. 

$1.25. 
Guyot, Yves — Where and Why Public Ownership has Failed. Macmil- 

lan. 1914. $1.50. 

Johnson, E. R. — American Railway Transportation. Rev. ed. Apple- 
ton. 1904. $1.50. 

Kenna, E. D. — Railway Misrules. Duffield. 1914. $1.25. 

McPherson, L. G. — Transportation in Europe. Holt. 1910. $1.50. 

Phelps, E. M. — Selected articles on Government Ownership of Rail- 
roads. Wilson. 1912. $1.00. 

American Academy of Political and Social Science — Railway and 
Traffic Problems. (Its Annals. March, 1907.) 

Bliss, W. D. P. ed. — Railways and Railway Problems. (In Encyclope- 
dia of Social Reform. New ed. 1908. p. 1017.) 

Bolen, G. L. — Railroad Problem. (In Plain Facts as to the Trusts. 
1903. p. 44.) 

Clark, V. S. — Government in Business. (In Labor Movement in Aus- 
tralia. 1906. p. 246.) 

Daniels, W. M. — Extension of the State's Contractual Income. (In 
Elements of Public Finance. 1899. p. 224.) 

Laughlin, J. L. — Railway Problem in the U. S. (In Industrial America. 
1906. p. 140.) 

Lloyd, H. D. — Nationalization of the Railroads. (In A Sovereign Peo- 
ple. 1907. p. 88.) 

Lusk, H. H. — Ownership of Public Utilities. (In Social Welfare in 
New Zealand. 1913. p. 198.) 

Meyer, B. H. — Railroad Ownership in Germany. (In Ripley, W. Z., 
Railway Problems. 1907. p. 660.) 

Scholefield, G. H. — State Railways and Government Management. (In 
New Zealand in Evolution. 1909. p. 260.) 

Shaw, Albert- — Problems of Economic Regulations, especially those re- 
lating to railroads and to industrial monopolies. (In Political 
Problems of American Development. 1907. p. 166.) 

Van Wagenen, Anthony — Government Ownership of Railways consid- 
ered as the next great step in American progress. Putnam. 1910. 
$1.25. 

Vrooman, C. S. — American Railway Problems in the Light of European 
Experience; or, Government Regulation vs. Government Operation 
of Railways. Oxford Univ. Press. 1910. $2.00. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 15 



PARTS OF BOOKS 

Academy of Political Science in the City of New York — The Govern- 
ment and Business. (In Its Proceedings. January, 1912. Vol. 2, 
No. 2, p. 153.) 

Weyl, W. E. — The Industrial Program of the Democracy. (In The New 
Democracy. 1912. p. 276.) 

PAMPHLETS AND PRIVATELY PRINTED DOCUMENTS 

Aitchison, C. B. — Present Problems in Public Service Regulation: An 
address * * * before the Oregon State Bar Ass'n., Portland, 
Oregon, November 19, 1913. 

Bryan, W. J. — Speeches on Government Ownership of Railroads with 
comments. (Partial list): 

1. Mr. Bryan on Government Ownership of Railroads. (Republi- 
can Campaign Textbook. 1908. p. 282.) 

2. Speech. (Portland Journal. August 31, 1906.) 

3. The Political Alternative. Edit. (Outlook. 84:5 8. Septem- 
ber 8, 1906.) 

4. Government Ownership of Railroads. Edit. (Oregonian. Sep- 
tember 1, 1906.) 

5. Democrats Doubt Bryan's New Plan. (Oregonian. Septem- 
tember 2, 1906.) 

6. Government Ownership of Railroads. Edit. (Portland Jour- 
nal. September 2, 1906.) 

7. Bryan Will Defeat Roosevelt. (Portland Journal. Septem- 
ber 4, 1906.) 

8. Government Railways. (Oregon Statesman. September 13, 
1906.) 

9. Mr. Bryan Comforts Railroads. (Collier's. April 13, 1907.) 

10. For Public Railroads. (Collier's. March 16, 1907.) 

11. Comments on Bryan's Speech. (N. Y. Evening Post. Sep- 
tember 1, 1908.) 

12. Driving People to Bryan's Camp. (Oregonian. March 2, 1907.) 
Dunn, S. O. — Some often overlooked points regarding government own- 
ership, delivered * * * before the Traffic Club of New Eng- 
land, annual meeting, December 6, 1912. 44 Federal St., Boston, 
Mass. Traffic Club of New England. 10c. 

Vrooman, Carl — The Present Railway Situation in the U. S.; Regula- 
tion vs. Public Ownership; an address, January 11, 1913. (In City 
Club Bulletin, Vol. 6, No. 2, February 3, 1913.) 



16 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 
OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

ARTICLE I 
NAME 

This organization shall be known as the Oregon High School 
Debating League. 

ARTICLE II 
OBJECT 
The object of this League is improvement in debate among the 
students in the high schools of the State of Oregon. 

ARTICLE III 
MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Any public high school in Oregon which maintains a 
debating society throughout the year may become a member of this 
League upon application to the Executive Committee of the League 
and shall retain such membership so long as it conforms to the con- 
stitution and by-laws. 

Section 2. All schools seeking admission for any particular year 
must join by October 15 of that year. 

Section 3. The annual dues of one dollar shall be paid to the 
Treasurer by October 15. Failure to pay dues shall cancel membership. 

ARTICLE IV 
OFFICERS, COMMITTEES, DUTIES 

Section 1. The officers of the League shall be a President and a 
Secretary-Treasurer. They shall be elected at the annual meeting. 

Section 2. The Executive Committee of the League shall consist 
of the President and the Secretary, who shall act with the State. 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, the President of the University 
of Oregon, and the Secretary of the Oregon Library Commission. This 
committee shall have power to increase its membership by two addi- 
tional members, one of whom shall be a county superintendent. 

Section 3. (a) It shall be the duty of the President to preside at 
the annual meeting, and at the final contest, and, when necessary, to 
call meetings of the Executive Committee. 

(b) It shall be the duty of the Secretary-Treasurer to keep minutes 
of the annual meeting, and of the meetings of the Executive Committee; 
to disburse funds upon order of the Executive Committee; to collect 
annual dues and perform other duties pertaining to the office. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee: 

To pair the district champion teams, to choose sides and to make 
other arrangements for the inter-district contests, on the basis of 
convenience and least expense. The pairing and choice of sides for the 
inter-district and final debates shall begin before the conclusion of the 
district debates, and the Secretary shall submit the schedule to the 
Executive Committee before it becomes final. 

To cooperate with the two directors, whose districts shall be repre- 
sented in the final contest, in making arrangements for that contest. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 17 



To select the question for debate. 

To prepare and have printed each year, before December 1, a 
year book containing the latest revision of the constitution and by-laws, 
the list of names and addresses of the officers, statement of question 
for district, inter-district and final contests, with bibliography, and 
such other matter as, in their judgment, may be helpful to the mem- 
bers of the League. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee shall appoint for each district 
one director who shall be the principal (or other representative) of 
the League high schools in his district. 

It shall be the duty of the director: 

To preside at the call meetings of the principals (or other repre- 
sentatives) of the League high schools in his district. 

To cooperate with the principals (or other representatives) of the 
League high schools in his district, in pairing the schools, and in mak- 
ing other arrangements for the several series of district contests on the 
basis of convenience and expense. In case of disagreement the district 
director shall have final authority in pairing teams. 

To file with the Secretary of the League, for permanent record, 
and for the reference of the Executive Committee, not later than 
November 5, an approved schedule of the debates for his district. 
He shall report to the Secretary the results of all contests immediately 
after they shall have been held, giving the names of the contesting 
schools and their representatives, together with the votes of the judges. 
No debate shall be considered as having been held under the auspices 
of the League unless the schedule shall have been filed with the 
Secretary as above directed, and the results immediately reported. 

To furnish the Executive Committee all other necessary informa- 
tion with regard to the workings of the League in his district. 

ARTICLE V 
MEETINGS, ELECTIONS 
Section 1. The directors in the several districts shall, at any time 
they deem it necessary, call meetings of the principals (or other repre- 
sentatives) of the league high schools in their respective districts. 

Sections 2. The annual meeting shall be held at the time of the 
State Teachers' Association. At this meeting the officers shall be 
elected, each for a period of one year. Each league high school shall 
be entitled to only one vote. 

ARTICLE VI 
DEBATING DISTRICTS 
The State shall be divided into debating districts by the Executive 
Board of the League. 

ARTICLE VII 

CONTESTS 

Section 1. District Contests. The district contests, held by teams 

representing the several high schools within each district, shall occur 

between the first of November and the first of February. The team 

winning in the last series of these contests shall be the district cham- 



18 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 

pion team. The triangular system of debate is urged wherever condi- 
tions permit, leaving the method of grouping by twos in other cases. 

Section 2. Inter-District Contests. The inter-district contests, held 
by the several district champion teams, shall occur between the first 
of March and the first of May. The two teams winning in these con- 
tests shall be the two inter-district champion teams. 

Section 3. Final Contest. The final contest, held by the two 
inter-district champion teams, shall be held at the University of Oregon 
at a time to be fixed by the Executive Committee. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Section 1. The debaters shall be undergraduate students of the 
schools which they represent, and shall have passing grades to date 
in at least three subjects that they are taking at the time of the 
contest. 

Section 2. The team that shall represent any league high school 
shall be selected by a series of try-outs. In cases where this seems 
impracticable a different method may be used when authorized by the 
Executive Committee. Without such permission the team selected in 
any other manner shall not be considered eligible to the district debates. 

Section 3, At all contests the debaters shall be separated from 
the audience and shall receive no coaching while the debate is in 
progress. 

Section 4. At all contests, in which each team shall be represented 
by three members, the time and order of the speeches shall be as 
follows: 

First speaker, affirmative, 12 minutes (introduction and direct 
argument). 

First speaker, negative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refuta- 
tion). 

Second speaker, affirmative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Second speaker, negative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Third speaker, affirmative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Third speaker, negative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Closer, negative, 6 minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, 6 minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Section 5. At all contests, in which each team shall be represented 
by two members, the time and order of the speeches shall be as 
follows: 

First speaker, affirmative, 15 minutes (introduction and direct 
argument). 

First speaker, negative, 15 minutes (direct argument and refuta- 
tion) . 

Second speaker, affirmative, 15 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation) . 

Second speaker, negative, 15 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 



DEBATING LEAGUE 19 



Closer, negative, 6 minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, 6 minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

No new argument allowed in either of the last two speeches. 

Section 6. There shall be no cheering while any debater is speak- 
ing and the chairman or presiding officer shall make this announce- 
ment before the debate and shall use all means to enforce the rule. 
In cases of cheering, time so consumed may be made up to the speaker 
at the discretion of the chairman or presiding officer. 

ARTICLE IX 

Section 1. At each contest there shall be three judges selected on 
the basis of capability and impartiality; and so far as possible, they 
shall be non-local. The principals of any two contesting schools may 
by mutual agreement, however, decide upon one judge to determine 
the issue, provided that three judges must be selected in all cases 
where the principals cannot agree upoD one judge. 

Section 2. The judges for inter-district debates shall be appointed 
by the Executive Committee, but in no case shall a member of said 
committee take part in the selection of judges in a case where he is 
personally interested. For the district contests, the principals of the 
two schools represented shall select the judges as follows: The prin- 
cipal of the visiting school shall submit a list of nine judges to the 
home school, from which to select three. If less than this number are 
satisfactory, the principal of the home school shall present a like list 
for selection, and so on until three mutually satisfactory judges are 
selected. The consideration of judges shall be taken up a month or 
more before the contest, and if possible, the final selection shall be 
made not less than a week before the debate. 

Section 3. As soon as the judges shall be selected, they shall be 
supplied each with a copy of "How to Judge a Debate." Copies can be 
secured from the district directors or from the Secretary of the League. 

Section 4. During the debate the judges shall sit apart from one 
another. They shall take into consideration argument, rebuttal, and 
effectiveness, and shall base their decision on the merits of the debate 
and not on the merits of the question. Each judge at the conclusion of 
the contest, without consultation with any other judge, shall write on 
a card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal it in an envelope, 
and deliver it to the presiding officer, who shall open the envelopes in 
sight of the two leaders, and then announce to the audience the 
decision. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 



The following score card shall be handed each judge, for his private 
use, and shall not be handed in with the judge's final vote: 

(FACE) 

SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote.) 



Affirmative 
First Speaker 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness 


Total 


Second Speaker .. 








Third Speaker 






Total 












Negative 
First Speaker 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness 


Total 


Second Speaker 






Third Speaker 










Total 



















N. B. — Ttie marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



II. 



II. 



IV. 



(BACK) 

INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate 
card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelope 
and hand to the presiding officer. 

Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be 
given credit for rebuttal. 

Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 
its skillful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 
argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleas- 
ing delivery. 

Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on 
the merits of the question. 

No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 



DEBATING LEAGUE 21 



ARTICLE X 
EXPENSES 

Section 1. In all triangular and dual contests, both district and 
inter-district, in which each school is represented by an affirmative and 
a negative team, the expenses of the judges, and the hotel bills and 
railway mileage of the visiting teams (the three — or two, as the case 
may be — debaters and one member of the high school faculty) shall be 
pooled and borne equally by the competing schools. Immediately after 
each contest, each school shall submit an itemized account of its 
expenses to the director of the district, or some one appointed by him. 
The director shall add the total expenses, divide them proportionately, 
and make such collections and reimbursements as may be necessary to 
effect an equitable adjustment of expense burdens. In all contests 
which involve a single debate, the principals of competing schools shall 
mutually agree upon an equitable division of expenses. The consid- 
eration of this question shall be taken up a month or more before the 
contest. If a satisfactory agreement shall not have been reached at 
least two weeks before the contest, the question shall be referred to 
the district director for final adjudication and settlement. In case the 
school of any district may be able to agree upon some other more 
satisfactory system, they shall not be bound by this section in their 
intra-district contests. 

Section 2. Whenever two competing teams may find it more con- 
venient or less expensive to meet at some halfway point, the two 
schools represented by these teams shall share equally the expense, or 
make some special arrangements for defraying the expenses of that 
particular debate. 

Section 3. At the final contest the University shall pay the ex- 
penses of the judges and the hotel bills and traveling expenses of 
the two teams. 

ARTICLE XI 

AMENDMENTS 

This constitution and by-laws may be amended at any annual meet- 
ing by a majority of the league high schools present. But no school 
shall have more than one vote. Amendments may also be made at any 
time by majority vote of the Executive Committee, subject to ratifica- 
tion at the next annual meeting. 

BY-LAWS 

1. It shall be considered improper to entertain judges before the 
contest at any place other than the hotel. 

2. After arrangements for any preliminary debate are concluded, 
the statement of the question for debate may be changed with the 
consent of the teams concerned. But the team desiring the change 
must restate the question and secure the consent of the other team. 

3. It shall be considered dishonorable for one school to visit the 
debates of another school when these two schools are likely to meet 
on the same question. 

4. It shall be considered dishonorable for any debater, in any 
manner, to plagiarize his speech. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 



5. The question for intra-district debates shall be the district 
question selected by the Executive Committee, or, it may be a question 
selected by the principals of the contesting schools; but in no case shall 
an intra-district question be the same as the State and inter-district 
question, unless specially authorized by the Executive Committee. 
These restrictions do not apply to try-outs within the school. 

6. The inter-district question shall be the same as the State 
question. 

7. CountieiS with less than seventy-five high school students 
registered in all the schools of the county may enter the League with 
a team selected by a series of try-outs from all the high schools of the 
county. 

8. The "[Tniversity of Oregon Cup" shall become the permanent 
property of the school winning it three times. A "League Cup" shall 
be given to the school failing to hold the "University of Oregon Cup" 
a second year, said "League Cup" to be held permanently by the school. 

9. Each school shall appoint a timekeeper. The two timekeepers 
shall sit directly in front of the speakers, and shall enforce the time 
limit and shall give such warning as the leader of each team shall 
direct. 



THE LISfiAfiy (If THE 
NOV 1 - 1929 

UNIVEBSITy OF ILLINOIS 



^' ^^, OTIYEESITY OF OREGON BULLETIN 

New Series OCTOBER, 1915 Vol. XIII, No. 2 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 
DEBATING LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
SCHOOL YEAR 1915-1916 



mmL 



|3^^BHBflBi^l 


o^-rxi Of 


v^' 


-my^^^'^-^ 




Prepared by 




EARL KILPATRICK 




Secretary of the League 




Assistant Director of the Extension Division 


University of Oregon 





PubHshed monthlj^ by the University of Oregon, and entered at the postoffice in 
Eugene, Oregon, as second-class matter. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 
DEBATING LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
SCHOOL YEAR 1915-1916 







THE L1DP.ARY OF THE 

NOV 9 - 1929 



UNIVERSITv OF ILLINOIS 



Salem^ Oregon : 

State Printing Department 

1915 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 




VICTOR BRADISON, LYLE BARTHOLOMEW 

Salem High School — Championship Winners, 1915 




HAROLD VENSKE WILLARD LEWIS 

Enterprise High Sehol — Second Honors, 1915 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Pictures of Champions of 1915 2 

Officers for the Year 1915-16 4 

Executive Committee 4 

Districts and District Directors... 5 

Membership of the League 1914-15 5 

Letter to the League from President R. L. Kirk G 

Statement of the Question for 1915-16 6 

A Plan for Stimulating Interest, J. A. Churchill 7 

The Real Value of Debate Work, Earl Kilpatrick 7 

The Essentials of the Swiss System 9 

Aids for Debaters 9 

How to Borrow Debate Libraries 11 

Bibliography of the Question, State Library 12 

Constitution and By-Laws of the League 17 

Score Cards for Use of Judges 23 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1915-16 

R. L. Kirk, Superintendent of Schools, Springfield, President. 

Earl Kilpatrick, Assistant Director of the Extension Division, 

University of Oregon, Eugene, Secretary-Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

P. L. Campbell, President of the University of Oregon. 

J. A. Churchill, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

R. L. Kirk, Superintendent of the Springfield Schools. 

Cornelia Marvin, Secretary of the Oregon State Library. 

Earl Kilpatrick, Assistant Director of the Extension Division, 

University of Oregon. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



THE DISTRICTS AND THEIR DIRECTORS 



Coos Bay — Superintendent F. A. Tiedgen, 
Coos and Curry Counties. Champion in 1915: 
defeated by Salem. 



Marshfield, Director. 
Bandon High School, 



Eastern Oregon — Principal Charles E. Olson, La Grande High 
School, Director. Union, Wallowa, Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney 
Counties. Champion in 1915: Enterprise High School, defeated in 
final contest for championship of the State by Salem. 

Lower Columbia — Superintendent J. G. Imel of Astoria, Director. 
Tillamook, Clatsop, Columbia and Multnomah Counties. Champion in 
1915: Astoria High School, defeated by Prineville. 

Northern Willamette — Principal J. C. Nelson of Salem High School, 
Director. Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, Polk and Marion Counties. 
Champion in 1915: Salem High School, winner of the State cham- 
pionship. 

Southern Oreg(m — Superintendent George A. Briscoe of Ashland, 
Director. Josephine, Jackson, Klamath and Lake Counties. Champion 
in 1915: Medford High School, defeated by Bandon. 

Southern AVillamette — Principal A. R. Nichols of Corvallis High 
School, Director. Lincoln, Benton, Linn, Lane and Douglas Counties. 
Champion in 1915: Albany High School, defeated by Salem. 

Umatilla — Principal A. C. Hampton of Pendleton High School, 
Director. Umatilla, Morrow, Gilliam and Wheeler Counties. Champion 
in 1915: Pendleton High School, defeated by Enterprise. 

Upper Columbia — Principal H. C. Baughm.an of Crook County High 
School, Prineville, Director. Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Crook and 
Jefferson Counties. Chamjiion in 1915: Prineville, defeated by 
Enterprise. 



MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE, 1914-15 



Albany 

Ashland 

Astoria 

Bandon 

Canby 

Central Point 

Corvallis 

Coquille 

Creswell 

Dayton 

Dufur 

Enterprise 

Estacada 

Eugene 



Poorest Grove 
Grants Pass 
Gresham 
Junction City 
La Grande 
Lebanon 
Marshfield 
McMinnville 
Medford 
Myrtle Creek 
Myrtle Point 
Newberg 
North Bend 



Oregon City 

Pendleton 

Prineville 

Salem 

Scappoose 

Silverton 

Springfield 

St. Johns 

The Dalles 

Tillamook 

Union 

Wasco 

Weston 

Woodburn 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



|;i:ttih]k I kom thi: i»m:sn)i:.\T oi' thk li:a(;i i: 

Springfield, Oregon, September 15, 1915. 
To the Oregon High School Debating League: 

The officers of the League are very anxious to make the coming 
year the best in the history of the organization. To secure this result 
it will be necessary to have the interest and cooperation of all the 
high school i)upils and teachers in the State. We hope that we may 
have this, and that you will assist us in every way possible. 

The executive committee has chosen a question that is of great 
interest in the United States today. Many people are thinking and 
studying on this problem. What we do in this League may have some 
lasting influence in formulating public sentiment in the matter. There 
is not a great deal of material at hand. Such as can be secured will be 
at your disposal as soon as possible. But let us have a great deal of 
original thinking on this subject. Let us have the work of students, 
thinking for the future and their own welfare. 

The officials of the League hoi)e that at an early date it will be 
possible to present the work of the League to the State Board of 
Education in such a way that work in debate and public speaking may 
have a permanent place in the High School Course of Study. It is to 
be hoped that many classes will be organized to carry the work on 
in this way. The inirpose of high school debating should be to ground 
as many people as ])ossible in the elements of debate and public 
speaking". This takes continued work, in regular classes. Organize 
your work on this basis, when possible, that you may reach the 
greatest possible number. 

Hoping that you will join with us in making this the best year 
in the history of the League, I am, 

Very respectfully yours, 

R. L. KIRK, 

Pres. O. H. S. D. L. 



QUESTION FOR DEBATE, 1915-16 

Resolved, That the United States should adopt the essential features 
of the Swiss system of military training and service. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 7 

A PLAN FOR STIMULATING INTEREST IN DEBATING 

By J. A. Churchill 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

To stimulate mtorest in debating in the schools throughout the 
State, i^ermit me to sur;gest a plan which was used with marked success 
in the high school which I last supervised. 

At the beginning of the year, an invitation was extended to all 
the pupils of the high school to organize themselves into debating 
teams, in groups of three. Several teams were formed by the pu])ils 
themselves, and others were organized by the principal of the high 
school, until there were sixteen teams. Eight of the teams were 
paired off against the other eight, and eight questions were assigned 
for debate. Six or seven weeks was given for preparation, and these 
eight preliminary debates were held two or three days apart. 

In judging the debates, two decisions were given by the judges. 
The judges passed on the merits of the debate, as is ordinarily done, 
and they also selected the best three debaters from the affirmative 
and negative upholders in each contest. These three constituted a 
new team, and the eight teams so selected were paired off as the 
original sixteen were. Questions were again assigned, and, after a 
sufficient time for preparation, another series of debates was held. 
The process of elimination was continued until but two teams were 
left. The debaters winning the final contest were declared the cham- 
pions of the school, and a silver loving cup, with their names engraved 
upon it, was placed in the trophy case of the high school. 

In preparing the debates, each team was urged to secure a coach 
and assistance was given in the matter by the principal of the high 
school. As a result, a number of the lawyers and ministers of the 
town were interested in the work. 

The debates were held in the auditorium of the public library and 
a small admission fee was charged. From the proceeds — a not incon- 
siderable sum — the expense for conducting the debates was jiaid; 
the trophy cup, presented to the winners, purchased; and the remainder 
placed to the credit of the student body fund. 

Through this plan more interest was created in debate through 
having a large number participate, and the cooperation of a large 
number of school patrons was secured. 

The English teachers lightened the theme work during the time 
a student was preparing for his debate, and in this way credit for the 
work was given. 

THE REAL VALVE OF ])EBATE A\ ORK 

By Karl Kii.patrtck. S<"cretary of tlie T^eague 

Debating, or formal oral discussion of interesting questions con- 
cerning which there is difference of opinion, has its ])lace in every-day 
life and in the every-day work of the school. No matter how fully 
we may develop the contest feature of debating work, the great 
majority of the pupils of the high schools and upper grades are not 
adequately reached, unless argumentative discussion is a feature of 
daily class work. 

Those who urge that the State League gives little opportunity for 
the rank and file of students to gain the benefit of debating must be 
answered with the frank statement that to give such opportunity 
directly is not the purpose of the League. If it can stimulate interest 
in debate; if it can assist in development of correct ideals and standards 
of judgment; if it can provide opportunity for every high school to 
measure itself, once a year, against other schools — the League has 
fulfilled the purposes for which it is maintained. Any school that 



8 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

depends upon inter-school contests to furnish training in debate is in 
the same indefensible position as are those schools which maintain no 
work in physical training aside from that administered to the football 
squad. 

Discussion of disputed or unsettled questions is a feature of nearly 
every recitation in civics from the seventh grade up. Disputed points 
arise in every other subject of the upper grades and the high school. 

Just as much discussion on street corners, in offices, and on the 
trains, is futile, shallow and productive of more animosity and mis- 
understanding than conviction; so, too, the discussions in the class 
room, while more dignified, because more restrained, often fail, through 
lack of logical attack of the matter under consideration, to bring the 
pupil to any well-reasoned conclusion, or even to working basis for 
further study. For the same reason, they may fail to develop in the 
young people appreciation of the importance of analytical, unbiased 
and comparative study of facts before forming a conclusion and of the 
value of being able to present and to defend that conclusion. 

Of great value in making discussion worth while is that attitude 
which leads the student to define and to limit the subject of his 
thought or discussion; then to study impartially and fully all phases 
of it; and finally to determine exactly where he feels he should stand 
on the matter. If such an attitude toward public questions can be 
carried over into life after school, the pupil has a large part of the 
equipment necessary to make him a safe recipient of the legislative 
power which Oregon vests in its citizens. 

Various devices stimulate interest in intra-school debating. High 
school literary societies flourish, under proper guidance, and are of 
great benefit to those most interested; or failing to find competent 
mentors, they die or degenerate into minstrel shows or groups of 
student politicians. Societies of the whole school with compulsory 
participation still exist in some high schools, and still arouse all the 
dislike for literary work which they have always aroused. 

Debate classes and debate squads running through the year are 
fairly successful in some places. Their weakness is that they are 
planned to serve the purposes of the contest debate; whereas the 
contest debate should be held merely to exemplify, to stimulate and 
to standardize work. 

After all, debate best serves the needs of the future citizen, when 
so interwoven with the regular curriculum as to form a natural and 
necessary part of every-day work and thus to need no stimulation. 
No real teacher denies to pupils, upon proper occasion, the privilege 
of entering into lively discussion, nor does she permit hit and miss 
discussion, based upon snap judgments and arbitrary opinion. Out 
of just such occasions is born the opportunity for real training in 
debate. Let the teacher insist upon the necessary preliminary steps 
until the pupil comes to realize that these steps are essential in the 
first consideration of any disputed or disputable matter. First, is the 
matter debatable? Can it be settled, even by a preponderance of 
evidence? If it cannot, let us not waste more time on it. If the 
matter is debatable, in what does the gist of it consist? What do the 
terms employed in stating it really mean? What topics are extraneous 
to the debate and most likely to lead one astray? What are the real 
points at issue? 

Rarely does a debate decision satisfy an audience as a whole. This 
is due i)artly to inexpert judges; partly to the natural pride and 
favoritism of friends, relatives and teachers — but most often to the 
fact that the question is really not resolved to its issues in such a way 
as to i)roduce a real clash and a real debate. 

When we have duly attended to the preliminary considerations 
touching disputed questions, and when pupils from the seventh grade 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 9 

up, and teachers as well, have observed these valuable formalities in 
class discussion, the good debater will know when he is beaten, either 
in a recitation in history or in the State contest in Villard Hall. 
Further, he will have gained that mastery of the machinery of thinking 
and of discussion which will enable him to get at the heart of a matter 
and to find his joy and his reward in the debate itself and not in the 
decision. 

ESSENTIALS OF THE SWISS SYSTEM 

From the Statesman's Year Book for 1914, p. 1337 

"Switzerland depends for defence upon a national militia. Service 
in this form is compulsory and universal, with few exceptions, except 
for physical disability. Those excused or rejected pay certain taxes 
in lieu. Liability extends from the seventeenth to the end of the 
forty-eighth year, actual service commencing at the age of twenty. 
The first twelve years are spent in the first line, called the "Auszug," 
or "Elite"; the next eight in the "Landwehr," and the remaining eight 
in the "Landsturm." For cavalry, however, service is eleven years in 
the Auszug and twelve years in the Landwehr. The Landsturm includes 
only men who have undergone some training. The "unarmed" 
Landsturm comprises all males between 20 and 5 whose services can 
be made available for non-combatant duties of any description. 

"The official training of the Swiss militia soldier is carried out 
in the recruits' schools and the i)eriods are 65 days for infantry, 
engineers and foot artillery; 7 5 days for field artillery, and 90 days 
for cavalry. The subsequent trainings called 'repetition courses' are 
eleven days annually; but after going through seven courses, (eight 
courses in the case of cavalry), further attendance is excused for all 
under the rank of sergeant. The Landwehr men are called out only 
once for training, also for eleven days." 

The Swiss military system finds its warrant in the constitution of 
Switzerland. This constitution is reprinted as No. 18 of Old South 
leaflets. 

The Swiss Confederation passes all laws affecting organization of 
the army, but the cantonal authorities execute these laws and make 
minor appointments in the army. 

AIDS FOK DEBATERS 

A list of books recommended by the State Library for high school 
libraries. The prices in parentheses are the "school prices" from the 
State School Library List. 

Parliamentary practice: 

Gushing. New Cushing's manual of parliamentary law and prac- 
tice; rev. by C. K. Gaines. Johnson, Blagden & McTurnan. 7 5c. 

Paul. Parliamentary law. Century. 75c (68c). 

Robert. Primer of parliamentary law. Doubleday. 7 5c (57c). 

Robert. Rules of order. Scott. 75c (50c). 
Public speaking: 

Clark & Blanchard. Practical public speaking. Scribner. $1.00 (90c). 

Everts. The speaking voice: principles of training simplified and 
condensed. Harper. $1.00 (7 8c). 

Shurter. Extempore speaking for school and college. Ginn. 9 0c 
(77c). 
Debating : 

Alden. Art of debate. Holt. $1.12 ($1.00). 

Carnegie library, Pittsburg. Debate index. 2d ed. Pittsburg, 
Carnegie library. 20c. 

An index to the debaters' manuals in tlie Carnegie Library, Pittsburg. 



10 OREGOxN HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



Foster. Argumentation and debating. Houghton. $1.25. 

Contains spccimcni briefs and (1el)at(^s and a list of iiropositions for 
(Icbale foi' advanced students. 

Foster. Essentials of exposition and argument. Houghton. 90c 
(78c). 

The best bool< upon tin- subject. Based upon liis "Argumentation 
and debatiiK';." 

Gardiner. The making of arguments. Ginn. $1.00. 
Jones. Manual for debaters, with a list of questions and a bibliog- 
raphy. University of Washington. ISc. 
Laycock, Craven & Spofford. Manual of argumentation for high 
schools and academies. Macmillan. 50c (44c). 
Excellent book for beginners. 
Laycock & Scales. Argumentation and debate, Macmillan. $1.10. 
A good exposition of the principles of deliating. More advanced than 
the book abo\e 

Thomas. Manual of debate. American Book Co. 80c (68c). 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. Debating societies: 

organization and procedure. 2d ed. University of Wisconsin. 

10c. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. How to judge a debate. 

University of Wisconsin. 10c. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. Principles of effective 

debating. 3d ed. Wilson. 15c. 

The State I.,ibrar\' has a f* vv copies of these Wisc(msin painplilets for 
distritubtion. 

Questions with briefs: 

Brookings & Ringwalt. Briefs for debate on current political, 
economic and social topics. Longmans. $1.25. 
Note preface on "The art of debate." 
Carpenter. Debate outlines on public questions. New ed. Broad- 
way Pub. Co. $1.00. 
Ringwalt. Briefs on public questions. Longmans. $1.20 (95c). 
Robbins. High school debate book. McClurg. $1.00 (85c). 

Excellent for beginnei's. 
Shurter. Both sides of 100 public questions. Hinds, Noble & 
Eldredge. $1.25. 
Periodical articles: 

Readers' guide to periodical literature, 1900-1904. Wilson. $16.00 
($8.00). 

1905-1909. Wilson. $24.00 ($12.00). 

Annual volumes, 1910-date. Wilson. $7.00 ( $3.50) each. 

A file of some of the best periodicals is desirable, and a team 
which is constantly debating- public questions must have access to 
the current numbers of the Outlook and Nation. Indexes to current 
magazines and newspapers are essential. All available indexes are 
owned by the State Library, and will be consulted for any subject 
upon request. It is possible that many of the magazine references 
may be borrowed from the people of the different towns. Articles 
indexed in the pul)lications noted above may be rented from the 
H. W. Wilson Co., White Plains, New York. Cost of first article in 
each order is 10c, and for each additional article ordered at the 
same time, 5c. 

(Apply to Department or Congressman.) 

(iovo! iiineiit Documents : 

The library should have a file of the reports and bulletins of the 
Labor Department; sets of reports of the Department of Com- 
merce; a set of publications of last census; the Statistical 
Abstract; the last Official Directory; Consular reports (with 
indexes); recent volumes of Congressional Record; Presidents' 
messages; Industrial Commission rei)ort (difficult to secure); 
other sets should be secured for special needs — Reports of 
Commissioner of Immigration for debate on that subject, etc. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 11 

Indexes to Government Documents: 

Write to Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C, for the 
following: 

Catalog of public documents of the 5 3d-Glst Congresses and all 
departments of the government, March 4, 1893-June 30, 1911, 
vols. 1-10. 

Tables of and annotated indexes to the Congressional series of 
United States public documents. 1902. 

Index to the subjects of the documents and reports and to the com- 
mittees, senators and representatives presenting them, with 
tables of the same in numerical order, being the "Consolidated 
index" provided for by the Act of January 12, 1895. 5 4th Con- 
gress, 1st session-date. December, 189 5-date. 

Check list of United States public documents, 1789-1909. 3d ed. 
Vol. 2, not yet published, will be an index to Vol. 1. 

Monthly catalog, United States public documents. $1.10 a year. 
State Documents: 

Every high school should have access to recent Oregon state docu- 
ments, and particularly the Oregon Blue Book, and the annual 
report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and annual report of 
State Industrial Accident Commission. Many of the public 
libraries receive one copy of each Oregon document, and their 
files should be consulted before application is made for copies 
for a scliool. The Oregon Blue Book is distributed by the Secre- 
tary of State. For lists of recent publications of the various 
states the Monthly list of state publications, which may be 
obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, 
D. C, for 50c a year, is most useful. 
Almanacs and Year Books: (The last annual issue for each is given). 

American year book, 1914. Appleton. $3.00 ($2.70). 

Especially ilspTuI in tlic fielils of ocoiiomics, political .«;cience. ]niblic 
works, legislation, connni'ic:", politics, anrl government. 

Britannica year book, 1913. Encyclopedia Britannica Co. $2.25 
($2.08). 

Historical and statistical, covei-ini;- the y(>ai-s 1910-12. 
Chicago Daily News almanac and year book, 1915. Chicago Daily 

News. 25 c. 
New international year book, 1914. Dodd. $5.00 ($4.00). 

Contains very full articles on all events of importance during the 
year and on all sidijects that have been marked by cliange or 
progress. 

Statesman's year book, 1915. Macmillan. $3.00 ($2.70). 

World almanac and encyclopedia, 1915. New York Press Pub. Co. 

35c. ; 

General: 

Bliss. Encyclopedia of social reform. Funk. $7.5 0. 

Cyclopedia of American government; ed. by A. C. McLaughlin and 
A. B. Hart. 3 v. Appleton. $22.50. 
Encyclopedias : 

References are not given to these, but it is assumed that debaters 
will look up all questions in the New International and Bri- 
tannica encyclopedias. 

HOW TO BORROW DEBATE LIBRARIES FROM THE 
STATE LIBRxlRY, SALEM 

These collections of material upon public questions are loaned 
without charge to Oregon schools upon proper application. This means 
that the application must be made by the principal, or by the teacher 



12 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

who is in charge of the debate work. Loans are made through public 
libraries when possible, as it is generally considered better to supple- 
ment public library collections so that schools shall not pay cost of 
transportation upon material which is to be had locally, and shall not 
deprive other schools of this. The rules for debate library loans may 
be had upon application. The period of the loan is three weeks with 
l)ossible renewal for two weeks if the material is not needed elsewhere. 
It is better for schools to apply for small libraries to be kept a short 
time, rather than to ask for complete libraries which cannot profitably 
be used in so short a time. No loans are made to schools which mark 
the books and pamphlets and return them in bad condition. The fine 
for keeping libraries beyond time is 25c a day. Privileges of the library 
are withdrawn in case of loss of pieces. 

The State Library makes every effort to meet the needs of the 
schools, but it has many borrowers among schools and debating socie- 
ties and can do justice to all of them only by enforcing the rules 
strictly. A new list of questions for debate will soon be issued, giving 
the titles of the books which high school debating societies should 
collect. 

The University of Oregon Library, Eugene, will also be able to 
furnish some reading material on the question of the Swiss Military 
System to members of the. League. Make enquiries of the Librarian, 
Mr. M. H. Douglass. 

READIXC; LIST AXD SUGGESTIONS HY THE OKEGOX 
STATE LIBRARY 

This list contains the more important books and periodical articles 
on the subject of national defense and compulsory military training. 
Very little of the material bears directly on the Swiss system, but all 
of it will be useful in a consideration of the adoption of this system 
by the Ignited States. 

Libraries should have as many as possible of the items listed. Many 
of the pamphlets may be secured at little or no cost from the societies 
publishing them. Books should be bought through one dealer, not 
from the individual publishers. The periodicals noted are all of recent 
issue, and if not in the local library jjrobably may be found in homes 
in the community. 

At least one copy of every item in the bibliography is in the State 
Library, and will be loaned under the usual conditions. The library 
contains other material also, and will add to its collection as rapidly 
as new publications are issued. Schools having any of this material 
should so state in their application, to avoid duplication and to insure 
the best service to all. If articles on any special point are desired 
special mention of that fact should be made, otherwise a selection will 
be sent covering all sides as far as possible. The only available brief 
is one entitled "Military training for college students," published in 
the Independent, April 12, 1915. 

The H. W. Wilson Co. is preparing a handbook on military training, 
to be issued November 15, price 25 cents. 

DISARMAMENT 

Rooks: 

Allen. The drain of armaments. The cost of i)eace under arms. 

1913. World Peace Foundation, 40 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 
Angell, Norman, pseud. Arms and industry. 1914. Putnam. $1.25. 
Angell, Norman, pseud. The great illusion. 4th ed. 1913. Putnam. 

$1.00. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 13 



Butler. The international mind. 1912. Scribner. 7 5c. 

Carnegie. Armaments and their results. Peace Society of the City 

of New York, 50 7 Fifth Avenue, New York. 
Chittenden. War or peace? a present duty and a future hope. 1911. 

McClurg. $1.00. 
Emery. Some economic aspects of war. 1914. Washington, Govt. 
Johnston. Arms and the race. 1915. Century. $1.00. 

Written to arouse public opinion on the question of national defense, 
and should be read in connection with that subject, also. 

Jordan. War and waste. 1913. Doubleday. $1.25. 

Jordan. What shall we say? 1913. World Peace Foundation, 

40 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 
Lea. The valor of ignorance. 1909. Harper. $1.80. 
Lynch. Peace problem, the task of the twentieth century. 1911. 

Revell. 7 5c. 
McCabe & Darien. Can we disarm? 1899. Duffield. $1.25. 
Mahan. Armaments and arbitration. 1911, Harper. $1.40. 
Mead. Outline of lessons on war and peace. 1915. World Peace 

Foundation, 4 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 
Mead. Swords and ploughshares. 1912. Putnam. $1.50. 
Novicow. War and its alleged benefits. 1911. Holt. $1.00. 
Reely. Selected articles on world peace, including international 

arbitration and disarmament. 1914. H. W. Wilson Co. $1.00. 

Periodical Articles : 

In quoting- pei'iodical articles the practice of the periodical indexes 
has been followed, and the reference is given in the following order : 
First, title of article ; second, name of avithor ; third, name of magazine, 
followed by volume, pages and date of publication. 

Peace and disarmament. W. M. Shuster. Century, 89:503-11, 

Feb., 1915. 
Arms and the race. R. M. Johnston. Century, 89:648-58, March, 

1915. 
International disarmament. Arturo Labriola. Forum, 53:54-7, 

Jan., 1915. 
National defense. Outlook, 108:865-66, Dec. 16, 1914. 
National security and international i)eace. Outlook, 110:409-13, 

June 23, 1915. 
Pacificism and preparedness: a poll of the press. Outlook, 110:495- 

99, June 30, 1915. 
Speculation as to disarmament. T. S. Woolsey. Yale rev. 2:534-39, 

April, 1913. 

NATIONAL DEFENSE 

Books : 

American League to Limit Armaments. Memorandum of points in 

opposition to the increase of the army and navy of the United 

States at the present time. 1915. American League to Limit 

Armaments, 4 3 Cedar Street, New York. 
Bacon. Selected articles on national defense. 1915. H. W. Wilson 

Co. 25c. 
Butler. The preparedness of America. 1914. Carnegie Endowment 

for International Peace, 407 W. 117th Street, New York. 
Green. Present military situation in the United States. 1915. 

Scribner. 75c. 

"To any person desiring a temperate and well-informed presentation 

of our actual military status, such as can be read and pondered over at 

a sitting, this book can be commended." F. A. Ogg. 

Huidekoper. Military unpreparedness of the United States. 1915. 
McBride. $1.00. 



14 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DERATING LEAGUE 

Maxim. Defenseless America. 1915. Hearst's International 
Library. $2.00. 

"Tlu' main ()l)j(H't of lliis \H)ok is to picsent a plialanx of facts upon 
Llu' Hubject of tlie defenseless eondition of tliis country, and to show what 
must be done, and done quickly, in order to avert the most dire calamity 
tluit can fall upon a people — that of merciless invasion by a foreign 
foe." Pref. 

Roosevelt. America and the world war. 1915. Scribner. 75c. 

Stockton. Peace insurance. 1915. McClurg. $1.00. 

"He discusses the arj^'uments against military and navy 'prepared- 
ness', and bases their refutation on S(H^mingly broad and thorough 
knowledge of the history of nations, tlie underlying causes of war. 
and a careful study of official statistics and of the present situation." 
Wisconsin Library Bulletin. 

Union League Club, New York. Resolutions and report of the 
Union League Club and its committee, named Dec. 10, 1914, 
in connection with the resolutions offered by Senator Lodge 
and Representative Gardner in the Congress of the United 
States, and Hon. Howard Conkling in the Assembly of the 
State of New York. 1915. 

Officers' training corps of Great Britain, The Australian system of 
national defense, The Swiss system of national defense. 1915. 
Washington, Govt. 

U. S. — 63d Cong., 3d Sess. Senate Doc. No. 796. 

Extracts from reports on tiie tlu-ee systems. Each tc-am should have 
a copy of this pamphlet which may be secured through tlie local member 
of Congress. 

U. S. — General Staff. Facts of interest concerning the military 
resources and policy of the United States. 1914. Washington, 
Govt. 

This is of special interest and sliould be sccvu-ed by eacli team. 
U. S.— War Dept. Annual report of the Secretary of War, 1914. 
1914. Washington, Govt. 

The 1915 report sliould l)e obtained as soon as issued. 
Wheeler. Are we ready? 1915. Houghton. $1.50. 

"Articles reprinted from Harper's Weekly (see note below). The 
writer supports his plea for military preparedness by a study of actual 
conditions as they exist in tlie United States army, navy, and militia; 
and shows graphically how complete is our unreadiness by picturing the 
effects of an imaginary attack on New York City. He points out the 
weakness of our system as compar(^d wHh those of Switzerland and 
Australia, and suggests improvements." A. L. A. Booklist. 

Periodical Articles: 

Arms and the race. R. M. Johnston. Century, 89:649-58, March, 

1915. 
National defense. L. M. Garrison. Century, 89:675-82, March, 1915. 
Congressional record, 52:99-113, Dec. 10, 1914. (Current file.) 
Congressional record, 52:1668-77, Jan. 15, 1915. (Current file.) 
Congressional record, 52:1911-17, Jan. 18, 1915. (Current file.) 
What we must do to provide adequate military and naval defense. 

Current opinion, 59:5-8, July, 1915. 
The war and America: what we need. L. M. Garrison. Harper's 

weekly, 61:79-81, July 24, 1915. 
Are we ready? H. D. Wheeler. Harper's weekly, 59:532-34, 

Dec. 5, 1914. 
The attack on New York. H. D. Wheeler. Harper's weekly, 59:556- 

59, Dec. 12, 1914. 
The home defense. H. D. Wheeler. Harper's weekly, 59:585-87, 

Dec. 19, 1914. 
The hole in our pocket. H. 1). Wheeler. Harper's weekly, 59:609- 

11, Dec. 26, 1914. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 15 



Well? H. D. Wheeler. Harper's weekly, 60:16-18, Jan. 2, 1915. 

Thc.Me five ai'ticles by Mr. Wheeler have been repul)lished in book 
form by Houghton, Mifflin Co. See entry above for pi-ice and de.scriptive 
note. 
Nation-wide press poll on army and navy increase. Literary digest, 

49:137-38, 162-69, Jan. 23, 1915. 
Our government's attitude toward national defense. Literary digest, 

49:1205-6, Dec. 19, 1914. 
"Preparedness" for what? New republic, 3:188-90, June 26, 1915. 
Democracy and military preparation: the ideal. Outlook, 108:663- 

66, Nov. 25, 1914. 
National defense. Outlook, 108:865-66, Dec. 16, 1914. 
America unready. L. M. Garrison. Outlook, 108:997-99, Dec. 30, 

1914. 
If it comes to war. Gregory Mason. Outlook, 110:307-8, June 9, 

1915. 
National security and international peace. Outlook, 110:409-13, 

June 23, 1915. 
Pacificism and preparedness: a poll of the press. Outlook, 110: 

495-99, June 30, 1915. 

MILITARY TRAINING 

For short accounts of the systems of the countries having- compulsory 
military training, see the Statesman's Year-book, 1915, under name of 
country, sub-head, defence ; also, the Encyclopedia Britannica, under name 
of country, sub-head Army. The New International Encyclopedia vmder 
Armies, g^ives very brief summaries of the systems of the various coun- 
tries. Special note should be made of France, Germany, Australia, and 
Switzerland. The Cyclopedia of American Government, ed. by McLaugh- 
lin and Hart, v. 2, pp. 43 8-3 9, also contains an article on this subject. 

Books: 

Elliott. University presidents and the spirit of militarism in the 
United States. McKenzie. Non-military preparation for national 
defense. 1915. American association for international concilia- 
tion, 407 W. 117th Street, New York. 

U. S. — 63d Cong., 3d Sess. House. Committee on military affairs. 
Military training schools. 1915. Washington, Govt. (House 
report, number 1312.) 

Periodical Articles: 

Start citizen army. California outlook, 18:2, June 5, 1915. 
National defense against man and nature. G. H. Maxwell. California 

outlook, 18:8, 10, May 11, 1915. 
Address on "Peace and war" by Roosevelt (extracts). California 

outlook, 19:57-8, July 24, 1915. 
The ounce of prevention. R. M. Johnston. Century, 90:17-23, 

May, 1915. 
The army. James Hay. Congressional record, 52:2888-2901, Jan. 

29, 1915. 
Military reserve. J. W. Weeks. Congressional record, 52:134-43, 

Dec. 11, 1914. 
America — on guard! Theodore Roosevelt. Everybody's, 32:120-28, 

Jan., 1915. 
The minute-men myth. New republic, 1:9-10, Jan. 9, 1915. 
For a citizen army. W. L. Stoddard. New republic, 4:125-27, 

Sept. 5, 1915. 
The army of the United States. Sydney Brooks. 19th cent., 75: 

1194-1206, June, 1914. 
Voluntary or compulsory service? C. G. Coulton. 19th cent., 77: 

1-30, Jan., 1915. 



16 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



Switzerland and the war. Charles Borgeaud. North American, 
rev., 200:870-78, Dec, 1914. 

Democracy and military preparation. Outlook, 108:758-59, Dec. 2, 
1914. 

The army for a democracy. Outlook, 108:986-88, Dec. 30, 1914. 

Military camps for college students. A. W. Dunn. Review of re- 
views, 62:301-8, March, 1914. 

Neutral Switzerland. J. M. Vincent. Review of reviews, 52:73-6, 
July, 1915. 

The Plattsburg response. William Menkel. Review of reviews, 
62:301-8, Sept., 1915. 

The vital question of national defense. Review of reviews, 52:259- 
6 4, Sept., 1915. 

MILITARY TRAINING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

'Jliough compulsory military training in public schools is not a part 
of the Swiss educational system, "there exist more or less everywhere 
what are called cadet corps, voluntary organizations composed of boys 
from 11 to 16 years, in which setting up and marching drills and some 
exercises in the manual of arms are given." The following references 
are included because of this fact, and also because they have more or 
less bearing on the formation of a reserve. 

Books : 

Darby. Military drill in schools. American Peace Society, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 3c. 

Howe. A brief for military education in our schools and colleges. 
1915. Lucien Howe, 520 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, New York. 

MacCracken. Military drill in the schools of the U. S. (in U. S. — 
Bureau of education. Report, 1898-99. v. 1, pp. 479-88.) 

Orton. Status of the military department in the land-grant colleges. 
1915. Washington, Govt. 

Sargent. Military drill in the public schools, (in his Physical 
education. 1906. pp. 211-27.) 

Schaeffer & Finley. Should our educational system include activi- 
ties whose special purpose is preparation for war? 1915. Ameri- 
can school peace league, 405 Marlborough Street, Boston. 

I'eiHxlical Articles: 

Military training in the schools. Advocate of peace, 77:78, April, 

1915. 
Federal aid to military education in colleges. T. M. Spaulding. 

Education, 35:107-14, Oct., 1914. 
Every college should introduce military training. J. G. Schurman. 

Everybody's, 32:179-83, Feb., 1915. 
The colleges and national defense. J. G. Hibben. Independent, 

28:53z-33, June 28, 1915. 
Military training for college students: a debate (brief). Indepen- 
dent, 82:92, April 12, 1915. 
Militarizing our high schools. W. C. Allen. Messenger of peace, 

V. 12, no. 10, p]). 1-3. Jan., 1912. 
Militarism and schools. School and society, 1:35 3-5 5, March 6, 

1915. 

.\c\v.si)apei* Articles: 

Physical value in training: military drills in schools of more benefit 
than athletics. Oregonian, Aug. 6, 1915. 

Military training proposed, by W. L. Tooze. Oregonian, Aug. 8, 
1915. 

Military training in schools. Oregonian, Aug. 28, 1915. 

Australia finds its boys are better i)hysically and morally. Oregon- 
ian, Aug. 28, 1915. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 17 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 
OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

ARTICLE I 

NAME 

This organization shall be known as the Oregon High School 
Debating League. 

ARTICLE II 
OBJECT 
The object of this League is impro^^ement in debate among the 
students in the high schools of the State of Oregon. 

ARTICLE III 
MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Any public high school in Oregon which maintains a 
debating society throughout the year may become a member of this 
League upon application to the Executive Committee of the League 
and shall retain such membership so long as it conforms to the 
constitution and by-laws. 

Section 2. All schools seeking admission for any particular year 
must join by October 15 of that year. 

Section 8. The annual dues of one dollar shall be paid to the 
Treasurer by October 15. Failure to pay dues shall cancel membership. 

ARTICLE IV 
OFFICERS, COMMITTEES, DUTIES 

Section I. The officers of the League shall be a President and a 
Secretary-Treasurer. They shall be elected at the annual meeting. 

Section 2. The Executive Committee of the League shall consist 
of the President and the Secretary, who shall act with the State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, the President of the University 
of Oregon, and the Secretary of the Oregon Library Commission. This 
committee shall have power to increase its membership by two addi- 
tional members, one of whom shall be a county superintendent. 

Section 3. (a) It shall be the duty of the President to preside at 
the annual meeting, and at the final contest, and, when necessary, to 
call meetings of the Executive Committee. 

(b) It shall be the duty of the Secretary-Treasurer to keep minutes 
of the annual meeting, and of the meetings of the Executive Committee; 
to disburse funds upon order of the Executive Committee; to collect 
annual dues and perform other duties pertaining to the office. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee: 

To pair the district champion teams, to choose sides and to make 
other arrangements for the inter-district contests, on the basis of 
convenience and least expense. The i)airing and choice of sides for the 
inter-district and final debates shall begin before the conclusion of the 
district debates, and the Secretary shall submit the schedule to the 
Executive Committee before it becomes final. 

To cooperate with the two directors, whose districts shall be repre- 
sented in the final contest, in making arrangements for that contest. 

To select the question for debate. 

To prepare and have printed each year, before December 1, a 
year book containing the latest revision of the constitution and by-laws, 
the list of names and addresses of the officers, statement of question 
for district, inter-district and final contests, with bibliography, and 
such other matter as, in their judgment, may be helpful to the mem- 
bers of the League. 



18 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



Section 4. The Executive Committee shall api)oint for each district 
one director who shall be the principal (or other representative) of 
the League high schools in his district. 

It shall be the duty of the director: 

To preside at the call meetings of the principals (or other repre- 
sentatives) of the League high schools in his district. 

To cooperate with the principals (or other representatives) of the 
League high schools in his district, in pairing the schools, and in mak- 
ing other arrangements for the several series of district contests on the 
basis of convenience and expense. In case of disagreement the district 
director shall have final authority in pairing teams. 

To file with the Secretary of the League, for i)ermanent record, 
and for the reference of the Executive Committee, not later than 
November 5, an approved schedule of the debates for his district. 
He shall report to the Secretary the results of all contests immediately 
after they shall have been held, giving the names of the contesting 
schools and their representatives, together with the votes of the judges. 
No debate shall be considered as having been lield under the auspices 
of the League unless the schedule shall have been filed with the 
Secretary as above directed, and the results immediately reported. 

To furnish the Executive Committee all other necessary information 
with regard to the workings of the League in his district. 

ARTICLE V 
MEETINGS, ELECTIONS 
Section 1. The directors in the several districts shall, at any time 
they deem it necessary, call meetings of the principals (or other repre- 
sentatives) of the League high schools in their respective districts. 

Section 2. The annual meeting shall be held at the time of the 
State Teachers' Association. At this meeting the officers shall be 
elected, each for a period of one year. Each League high school shall 
be entitled to only one vote. 

ARTICLE VI 
DEBATING DISTRICTS 
The State shall be divided into debating districts by the Executive 
Board of the League. 

ARTICLE VII 
CONTESTS 

Section 1. District Contests. The district contests, held by teams 
representing the several high schools within each district, shall occur 
between the first of November and the first of February. The team 
winning in the last series of these contests shall be the district cham- 
pion team. The triangular system of debate is urged wherever condi- 
tions permit, leaving the method of grouping by twos in other cases. 

Section 2. Inter-district Contests. The inter-district contests, held 
by the several district cham])ion teams, shall occur between the first 
of March and the first of May. The two teams winning in these con- 
tests shall be the tv/o inter-district champion teams. 

Section 3. Final Contest. The final contest, held by the two 
inter-district chami)ion teams, shall be held at the University of Oregon 
at a time to be fixed by the Executive Committee. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Section 1. The debaters shall be undergraduate students of the 
schools which they represent, and shall have passing grades to date 
in at least three subjects that they are taking at the time of the contest. 



^EG0N_Hn3HSOT00LMBATING LEAGUE 19 

sha.f be^sllectel'V^T'eHef of ?" ^1^^?' ^"^ l^e7s^^<^^^,^,, 
impracticable a different method mavh.„»H "T^ '^'"''''' ""« ^^ems 
Executive Committee. WUhout s^df i.™ '"'• ""?," authorized by the 
any other manner shall not be con^wL'^ .r '"I?" "'"^ '<^^'" ^«le<=ted in 
Section 3. At all contests ?heTh J ®""f *■?, "'« '^''^'"'=t debates, 
the audience and shall .ecei^ve no cnacbf/ '"?", ''^ ^ei'a'-ated from 
progress. leceive no coaching while the debate is in 

hy S membtrs"'the°"t'rml' Ind'ord'er'^'^? It'"" ^'^^" "« represented 
follows: ® ^^^ °'^'^«'^ of the speeches shall be as 

argu'^mentr''""' ^"■™-'--. ^^ minutes (introduction and direct 
tionT.'"* """'"'■' "^«'^"^^' 12 minutes (direct argument and ren.ta- 
tationT"' ''"''^■■' ^«'™-'-e. 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation)"'"' '"'"'''■' "^^""^^' 12 """"'«'' 'direct argument and refu- 
tatio™.''' ''"''"''■ ««'™-«ve, 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tatio™.'' '"'"''^'•' "<^^''"^^> 12 minutes (direct argument and refu- 

cJoser'' afflrmlt.'ve '^"""^^ "-ebuttal and summary) 
sS 5 Tt all ^nntril''" •''^ (rebuttal and summary). 

by two members \hi^ rind' o'rdrr'Tthe',' '"T ^'f " ^^ -presented 
First speaker, affirmat"ye ?5 min fe.'r'^^i*"!"^" ''*' ^^ f°"»^^^: 

argument). ' '" """"tes (introduction and direct 

tionT:"' ""'"''■' "<^^""^«' IS "'-""t- 'direct argument and refuta- 

tationr"' ''"''"■• =*«'■•"-"-. 15 minutes (direct argument and refu- 

tation'r"' '"'"'"■' "'^='"^^' 1-5 "'""t"^ 'direct argument and refu- 

cJosIr' afnrmati'v! ™'"»'«^ "'^'^"'tal and summary). 

Nn nJ,'. ®' ^ nmi'ites (rebuttal and summary 1 

No new argument allowed in either of the last "wo Speeches 

ing ;{dThe^cha7;:ir'^r''„tiX?rf?i?|rrhL'ri m"a.-''%\"''^ '^' --•^- 

at the discretion ot the ch^i,ra"'"or'prs]dh?g7f?,><^'i.'.' '° "" ^'"^'^*'^ 

ARTICLE IX 

the;b^ro/-ca,faVi'^?^\^i:S%'aKSit'^''a,^l 's'oT i"''-^ ^^'<^^'^'> - 
shall be non-local. The princi als nf »;,/ ° '?'' ^^ Possible, they 

by mutual agreement, howeyerdec/de unornn''"'''.""* ""'^°°'^ ""^^ 
the issue, provided that three judges m-t br** 'V'^P *° determine 

"'le^t?olT"Xe'^1u1""°'f^^!-^""'"" -^ "" '" ^'"^ 

by the'Ex"ec'utiy?^C^;LlfSetb;\'Tn'i:rcle'%t1f ^'^^" "^ ^'"-'"'«d 
committee take part in the selection n? i ^ "'" "^ member ot said 
personally interested. For the district conl^'^' ";,^ '='''« "*■<"•« ^^ i^ 
two schools represented sha 1 se^fc the ludles''. V' 1?"""'''''^ <" »« 
cipal of the visiting school shaU submU a list J if^°^''. ^''^ •"■'"- 
home school, from which to select th're"f If 'I'ssta"!' Uiil^^r^bl^r !^r! 



20 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



satisfactory, the principal of the home school shall present a like list 
for selection, and so on until three mutually satisfactory judges are 
selected. The consideration of judges shall be taken up a month or 
more before the contest, and if possible, the final selection shall be 
made not less than a week before the debate. 

Section 3. As soon as the judges shall be selected, they shall be 
sui)plied each with a copy of "How to Judge a Debate." Coi)ies can be 
secured from the district directors or from the Secretary of the League. 

Section 4. During the debate the judges shall sit apart from one 
another. They shall take into consideration argument, rebuttal, and 
effectiveness, and shall base their decision on the merits of the debate 
and not on the merits of the question. Each judge at the conclusion of 
the contest, without consultation with any other judge, shall write on 
a card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal it in an envelope, 
and deliver it to the presiding officer, who shall open the envelopes in 
sight of the two leaders, and then announce to the audience the 
decision. 



riOV 8 - 1929 

UNIVERE'T^' OF ILLINOIS 



r 



^^ ne following score card shall be handed each judge, for his private 
lisc, and shall not be handed in with the judge's final vote: 

CORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES TN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote.) 




First Speaker 
Second Speaker 
J~ f tiird Speaker 



N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
division.s: Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote.) 



Affirmative 

First Speaker ... 

Second Speaker 

Third Speaker . 

Total 



Negative 

First Speaker ... 

Second Speaker 

Third Speaker . 

Total 



Argument 



Argument 



Rebuttal 



Effectiveness i 



Total 



Rebuttal 



Effectiveness 



Total 



N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument. Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEi^GUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote.) 



Affirmative 


Argument 


Relnittal 


Effectiveness 


Total 


First Speaker 

Second Speaker .. 


















Third Speaker .... 










Total 
















Negative 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness 


Total 


First Speaker 










Second Speaker .. 










Third Speaker .... 










Total 





















N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



INSTRIK^TIONS 

I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate 
card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelop'^ 
and hand to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated j 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall/ 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be 
given credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skillful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with 

pleasing delivery. 

IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and lot on 
the merits of the question. 

V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate 
card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelo])e 
and hand to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be 
given credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skillful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with 

l)leasing delivery. 

IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on 
the merits of the question. 

V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate 
card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelope 
and hand to the i)residing officer. 

II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be 
given credit for rebuttal. 
III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skillful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means imi)romptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the oi)posing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with 

pleasing delivery. 

IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on 
the merits of the question. 

V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote.